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Maxine Crissman “Woody and Lefty Lou” Radio Show Collection


Collection Title:

Maxine Crissman “Woody and Lefty Lou Radio Show” Collection

Collection Number: 

2016-002

Date Range:

1932-2006 (Bulk 1937-1938)

Extent:

8 linear feet (15 document boxes, 2 flat boxes, one shoe box)

Collection Processed by:

Managing Archivist Kate L. Blalack, Archivist 

Peter Addison, Intern (processing & preservation)

Catherine Hart, Intern (re-housing)

Collection Guide prepared by:

Managing Archivist Kate L. Blalack, Archivist (editor)

Updated by Peter Addison, Intern (current version)

Abby Cox, Intern (first draft)

Provenance:

Patricia Dempsey, only daughter of Maxine Crissman.

Historical Sketch:

Woody Guthrie traveled to California in May of 1937 with the Dust Bowl refugees. The storms had misplaced many Oklahomans and Texans. Woody’s cousin, Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie, lived in the Los Angeles area. He was a fellow musician and accomplished rodeo competitor. Through his cousin, Woody was introduced to the Crissman family who had traveled from Creighton, Missouri to Glendale, California in 1932. Woody and Leon (Jack) spent much of their time at the Crissman household, creatively passing the time. In June 1937 Woody and Leon (Jack) formed a musical partnership and looked for opportunities to showcase their talents. It was Leon’s (Jack) belief that having a radio show would allow he and Woody to gain a larger fanbase and attract bigger crowds at live performances. In June 1937 Woody, Leon (Jack), and the Beverly Hill Billies performed at the Strand Theater in Long Beach, CA. One month later Woody and Leon (Jack) secured a program spot on KFVD Radio in Los Angles, CA, called the Oklahoma and Woody Show. However, within weeks Leon (Jack) decided to leave the show and the Crissman’s youngest daughter, Maxine Crissman (later affectionately dubbed “Lefty Lou” by Woody Guthrie), filled his place. The Woody and Lefty Lou Radio Show was an almost immediate success. Although the program lasted less than a year, Woody and Crissman made an undeniable impression on the Los Angeles airwaves, especially within the migrant refugee communities. Over the course of several months thousands of fans sent letters, postcards, and fan mail to the duo – more than any program on the station. In early 1938 Woody and Crissman briefly switched stations to radio XELO in Tiajuana, on the boarder of Mexico, before returning to KFVD. This period in Woody Guthrie’s life marked an expansive growth in his social consciousness and is seen as a monumental milestone in his career as a musician and activist.

Scope and Contents:

The bulk of the collection contains personal and professional correspondence, and three radio songbooks from the Woody and Lefty Lou Radio Show on KFVD and XELO. The collection also contains numerous photographs, songbooks, manuscripts, lyrics and sheet music, original artwork, business records, as well as the banjo used for the radio show promo materials.

Related Material:

 Maxine Crissman Family Papers, Collection #2016-010 (Restricted; in processing).

 Language:

 English; & no linguistic content.

Collection Restrictions:

Restricted to in-house research.

 Usage Restrictions:

 Subject to copyright restrictions.

 Arrangement:

Bulk according to provenance; some preservation rehousing; some re-ordering.

List of Series:

Series I: Radio Songbooks

Series II: Radio Show Fan Correspondence

Series III: Manuscripts

Series IV: Business & Personal Correspondence

Series V: Photographs

Series VI: Miscellaneous  

Series VII: Artifacts

Series VIII: Clippings

Series IX: Artwork

Series X: Lyrics and Sheet Music

SERIES 1: RADIO SONGBOOKS

Box 01

Folder 01

Radio Songbook #1.1: Original on-air songbook (previously binder-bound) used by Woody Guthrie and Maxine Crissman on KFVD and XELO radio. Includes original songs by Woody, fan submissions, and traditional folk song lyrics along with contextual memos and marginalia. (Pages 1-60, C.A.  Fall 1937, Unpublished) [removed from binder for preservation]
Box 01

Folder 02

 

Radio Songbook #1.2: Original on-air songbook (previously binder-bound) used by Woody Guthrie and Maxine Crissman on KFVD and XELO radio. Includes original songs by Woody, fan submissions, and traditional folk song lyrics along with contextual memos and marginalia. (Pages 61-120, C.A. Late 1937-Early 1938, Unpublished) [removed from binder for preservation]
Box 01

Folder 03

Radio Songbook #1.3: Original on-air songbook (previously binder-bound) used by Woody Guthrie and Maxine Crissman on KFVD and XELO radio. Includes original songs by Woody, fan submissions, and traditional folk song lyrics along with contextual memos, marginalia, and some graphite sketches. (Pages 121-164 with Index, C.A. Late 1937-Early 1938, Unpublished) [removed from binder for preservation]
Box 01

Folder 04

Radio Songbook #2.1: Original on-air songbook (previously binder-bound) used by Woody Guthrie and Maxine Crissman on KFVD radio. Includes original songs by Woody and traditional folk and western song lyrics along with contextual memos, marginalia, and other annotations. (Pages 1-60, mostly unnumbered, C.A. early 1938, Unpublished) [removed from binder for preservation]
Box 01

Folder 05

Radio Songbook #2.2: Original on-air songbook (previously binder-bound) used by Woody Guthrie and Maxine “Lefty Lou” Crissman on KFVD radio. Includes original songs by Woody, fan submissions, traditional folk and western song lyrics along with contextual memos, marginalia, and other annotations. (Pages 61-157, mostly unnumbered, C.A. spring-mid 1938, Unpublished) [removed from binder for preservation]
Box 01

Folder 06

Radio Songbook #3.1: Original on-air songbook (previously binder-bound) used by Woody Guthrie and Maxine “Lefty Lou” Crissman on KFVD radio. Includes original songs by Woody, fan submissions, traditional folk and western song lyrics along with contextual memos, marginalia, graphite sketches, and some fan correspondence statistics. (Pages 1-36 with some unnumbered statistical information; C.A. fall 1937, Unpublished) [removed from binder from preservation]
Box 01

Folder 07

Radio Songbook #3.2: Original on-air songbook (previously binder-bound) used by Woody Guthrie and Maxine “Lefty Lou” Crissman on KFVD radio. Includes original songs by Woody, fan submissions, traditional folk and western song lyrics along with contextual memos, marginalia, and some graphite sketches. (Pages 37-87, C.A. fall 1937, Unpublished) [removed from binder for preservation]
Box 01

Folder 08

Radio Songbook #3.3: Original on-air songbook (previously binder-bound) used by Woody Guthrie and Maxine “Lefty Lou” Crissman on KFVD radio. Includes original songs by Woody, fan submissions, traditional folk and western song lyrics along with contextual memos, marginalia, and some graphite sketches. (Pages 88-148, C.A. fall 1937, Unpublished) [removed from binder for preservation]
Box 01

Folder 09

Radio Songbook #3.4: Original on-air songbook (previously binder-bound) used by Woody Guthrie and Maxine “Lefty Lou” Crissman on KFVD radio. Includes original songs by Woody, fan submissions, traditional folk and western song lyrics along with contextual memos, marginalia, and some graphite sketches. (Pages 149-212, C.A. fall 1937, Unpublished) [removed from binder for preservation]
Box 01

Folder 10

Radio Songbook #3.5: Original on-air songbook (previously binder-bound) used by Woody Guthrie and Maxine “Lefty Lou” Crissman on KFVD radio. Includes original songs by Woody, fan submissions, traditional folk and western song lyrics along with contextual memos, marginalia, and some graphite sketches. (Pages 217-246 with index, C.A. fall 1937, Unpublished) [removed from binder for preservation]
Box 06

Folder 42

Radio Songbook: Woody & Lefty Lou’s One Thousand and One Laffs and Your Free Gift of One Hundred and One Songs. Includes original songs by Woody, traditional folk and western song lyrics, and commentary below each song. (103 pages, C.A. spring 1938, Unpublished)
Box 04

Folder 37

Radio Songbook: Woody & Lefty Lou’s Favorite Collection Old Time Hill Billy Songs Been Sun Fer Ages Still Goin Strong!! (Self Publication)
Box 06

Folder 43

Radio Songbook: Woody and Lefty Lou’s Favorite Collection Old Time Hill Country Songs Being Sung for Ages Still Going Strong (KFVD Radio Publication)


SERIES 2: RADIO SHOW FAN CORRESPONDENCE

Box 02
Folder 01
October 30, 1937: From Anonymous; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “You were getting along quite well in your program this evening until you announced your ‘Nigger Blues…’

Re. one-page handwritten letter from an African American listener who resented Woody’s use of the word on a recent show. The author is a college student who believes that no person of any intelligence should use that word and recalls, in the letter, a recent incident when a newscaster on station KHJ was barred from announcing for use of that word. This letter had a profound impact on Woody and his perspective moving forward as a social advocate.

KFVD

Box 02
Folder 02
January 21, 1938: From Mrs. Valentine Schmittons; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “Would like to keep you on the air with your wonderful harmony…”

Re. one-page handwritten on lined notebook paper wishing Woody and Lefty Lou bigger and better opportunities.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 03

February 19, 1938: From P.G.S.; Hollywood, California. Envelope & Letter. “Today is the second time I have listened to your old Texas refrains and I shall never miss your program again…”

Re. folded stationary handwritten praise and request for “Dreamy Eyes that Haunt me Still,” “Moonlight and Roses,” and “Lost.”

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 04

January 26, 1938: From Lester L. Doyel; Terra Bella, California. Envelope & Letter. “I listen to your programs and enjoy them so much…”

Re. two and a half page handwritten letter with request for “Curly Headed Baby” and additional information to obtain songbook.

XELO

Box 02

Folder 05

October 28, 1937: From Tex Lee; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “I happen by chance tune in on your program tonight, and when I heard you say you was from Okla. then I became interisted [sic]…”

Re. one-page typed letter from former Oklahoma resident who lived in the area when it was still Indian territory. The author writes about the friends and family he still has in Texas and Oklahoma and wonders if Woody or Lefty Lou have come across any of them.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 06

December 31, 1937: From Mr. & Mrs. Glenn Couch; North Hollywood, California. Letter. “Enclosed find .10$ for a trail of “Salvocin” and a copy of your song book [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter requesting a songbook and offering “constructive criticism” regarding the “hillbilly act.”

Box 02

Folder 07

November 24, 1937: From Anonymous; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “Just rec. the song book and I sure am proud of it and thank you ever so much…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter with request to hear “Trouble in Mind” and reminding Lou not to change her wonderful “different” voice.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 08

No Date: From Estelle Jacobs; Unknown Location. Letter. “Now aint that sumpin [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter requesting to hear “Mama Blues” and postscript note hoping that a photographer will capture a picture of Woody and Lefty Lou.

Box 02

Folder 09

February 26, 1938: From Arkansas Pat; Yucaipa, California. Envelope & Letter. “I just got here from Arkansas about 2 months back & settled myself & family in this here town…”

Re. one-page letter handwritten on backside of Pasadena Independent advertisement; letter offers to convert abandoned property into a rent-house for $35 per month.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 10

February 21, 1938: From Estelle Jacobs; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “What are you trying to do loose me [sic]…”

Re. six-page handwritten letter about Tijuana, Mexico, hoopsnakes, Woody and Lefty Lou finding sponsorship, switching between radio stations, and a request for “Mama Blues.”

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 11

January 19, 1938: From Emma Barnard; El Monte, California. Envelope & Letter. “I am going to talk to you just like I do my kids…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter praising the “real” and “natural” presentation and content of the program, personal invitation to dinner, and request to hear “What Would You Take in Exchange for Your Soul.”

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 12

April 5, 1938: From Johnnie age 12; El Monte, California. Envelope & Letter. “Boy what a joke we had on my sister Eleanor…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter reminiscing about practical jokes within author’s family, the memory of a tornado, and request to hear “Home on the Range.”

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 13

February 24, 1938: From Mr. and Mrs. Leonard Bloodsworth; San Pedro, California. Envelope & Letter. “We listen to your program on the air and vote it first place of ALL radio programs…”

Re. one-page typed letter with a handwritten request for “Lonesome Valley.” Letter praises Lefty Lou’s singing and “Woodie’s” [sic] yodeling guitar, the “snake story,” and mentions their “whole gang” stopped listening to XELO after Woody and Lefty Lou switched stations.

Box 02

Folder 14

February 18, 1938: From Slim; La Puente, California. Envelope & Letter. “I’ve been listenin’ to you all since Oklahoma was with you in the morning…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter requesting to hear “Horse Neck Blues” for an ill friend, praising the program on KFVD, and requesting printed lyric sheets in exchange for postage.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 15

January 25, 1938: From Mrs. Inez Brisco; Mojave, California. Envelope & Letter. “Well, Woody I just hear you say you had been standing with your tongue out looking for mail, so I decided to increase your mail one letter any way [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter on folded stationary requesting to hear “Sweet Bunch of Daises” on the harp and hoping to eventually see a photograph of Woody and Lefty Lou.

XELO

Box 02

Folder 16

December 06, 1937: From Lee Brown; Willowbrook, California. Envelope & Letter. “I really haven’t much to say about your program, except that I like it…”

Re. one-page typed letter with enclosed 10 cents for a book of songs, a critique that the show is good, but “[they] do too much talking,” and a request to hear “Down Among the Blooming Roses.”

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 17

June 16, 1938: From Mrs. C. Johnston; Norco, California. Envelope & Letter. “I was away yesterday and did not hear your program and my husband was laid off from work at noon and got to listen…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter that praises the show for reminding the author of home. The author is upset that the show is ending because it reminds her of home. She grew up in Oklahoma and moved to California two years prior, but feels that the state is now overpopulated and also requests to hear “Jesus Hold my Hand” if the two can stay on the air long enough to fulfill her request.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 18

June 17, 1938: From Mrs. Mary H. Mitchell; Los Nietos, California. Envelope & Letter. “I have listened to your programs for quite a while and enjoy them very much…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from a “faithful” listener who suggests ending the show will “be like friends moving away.” Additionally, requests “Red River Valley” if possible.

KFBD

Box 02

Folder 19

June 17, 1938: From Mrs. S.D. Spain; San Diego, California. Envelope & Letter. “Am very sorry to hear you are leaving the airways & whats more Calif. to [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten on stationary from a “Missouri-Oklahoma hillbilly gal” who is sad to hear the program is ending and enclosed 10 cents for a copy of the lyrics to “Reno Blues.”

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 20

June 15, 1938: From Mrs. L.A. Elliot; Fullerton, California. Envelope & Letter. “On todays broadcast You stated you were leaving soon Which I was sorry to hear, Have been listening to your program and injoy your old time songs and music verry much hope you will change your minds and remain and send out cheer to thousands of listeners [sic]…”

Re. one-page typed letter from 88-year-old listener who does not want identity revealed over the air. Author would like a songbook but is “not a millionaire” and relies on “old age pension” and therefore is skeptical to send the appropriate fee because they believe mail can be unreliable.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 21

October 29, 1937: From Old Tex & Wife; Whittier, California. Envelope & Letter. “You boys & gal show do bring back old times to an old Texan [sic]…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter praising Woody and Lefty Lou’s Show and singing; also mentions Old Smoky & Texas Cow Town Boys.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 22

April 14, 1938: From Mr. & Mrs W.C. Care; Chino, California. Envelope & Letter. “My dear little westic Lou and Woody how are you dear childrens fine I know cause you sung my song I sent in to you [sic]…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter which apologizes for a previous letter which was sent with missing pages. Letter continues to summarize previous letter about an Arkansas storm.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 23

March 24, 1938: From Estelle Washington; Long Beach, California. Envelope & Letter. “Your program would be better if you would sing and play your guitars and french harp and preach for two hours each day…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter requesting “That Old Fashion Picture on the Wall” for author’s daughters. Also contains additional attachment note addressed to Lefty Lou that reads: “I am sending you a little handkerchief it’s not much but a little token of love. I will send Woody one when I get one.”

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 24

February 12, 1938: From W.C. Dodge & Emma Griffin; San Diego, California. Envelope & Letter. “You have no idea how thrilled we were yesterday when we accidentally tuned in on KFVD and heard Letsee Lou’s voice [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter about author rediscovering show on KFVD after previously being a loyal listener on XELO. Letter requests to hear “When the Roll is Call Up Yonder I’ll be There” and also encloses an address for Woody and Lefty Lou to notify author if the two change radio stations again.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 25

June 16, 1938: Mrs. W. J. Bake & Mrs. M.J Henderson; Fillmore, California. Envelope & Letter. “We have been listening to your program every day for some time and can’t say how much we hate to see you all go off the air…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter requesting to hear “The Tie That Binds,” wishing Woody and Lefty Lou a “nice vacation,” and hoping that they return to the air soon.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 26

June 16, 1938: From Anonymous; Van Nuys, California. Envelope & Letter. “I shall miss your quaint songs and your good singing more than I can ever tell you…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter on folded stationary paper wishing “God’s richest blessings” on Woody and Lefty Lou and requests to have one of the painted pictures of Christ but acknowledges “that may be impossible.” Also, “$1.00 Send-Back” is handwritten on envelope.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 27

January 28, 1938: From Rogene Parris; Escondido, California. Envelope & Letter. “Well Maxine I guess I know you I knew a girl back home by the name of Maxine Crissman…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter from an old Missourian who thinks they grew up with Maxine “Lefty Lou” Crissman. Letter asks Maxine if she has a sister named Grace, if she remembers a list of names from back home, or one particular night when her father played the violin. Postscript requests she say hello to Woody and that the two sing “Chinese & the Japs.”

XELO

Box 02

Folder 28

June 16, 1938: From Miss M. Inger; Glendale, California. Envelope, Letter, & Pressed Leaves. “Sure am sorry you are going to leave us but glad it will not be long…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from an “every day” listener who wishes Woody and Lefty Lou an enjoyable vacation. Mentions that the two sing songs that no other program will, in particular, “What Will You Give in Exchange for Your Soul” and “Never Miss Your Mother Till She’s Gone.” Also enclosed are pressed leaves and dried shrubbery.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 29

January 5, 1938: From F.E. Loving; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “Because of the fact you are from Okla I suspose I am a little partial to your program [sic]…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter from a former pastor of Morris Baptist Church in Okemah, Oklahoma, who relocated to California two years prior to work in carpentry. Author admires the show’s stand against landlords and other social issues by citing Christian values.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 30

February 20, 1938: From Forest M. Perkins; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “I feel just like you do about some of these so-called big fellows with about a yard of A.B., D.D.S, M.A. and such after their names…”

Re. three-page handwritten letter suggesting that most highly educated individuals could not relate to the average man. Author also writes about a hoopsnake sighting in Ohio, mention that his wife is from N.E. Oklahoma, and  requests to hear “Put My Little Shoes Away.”

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 31

June 17, 1938: From The Williams Family; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “I’m using this method of bidding you good by to tell you we will mis you [sic]…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter from a family that relocated to Los Angeles from Texas. Letter suggests that while on break, from the air and L.A., Woody and Lefty Lou could relocate to Texas and entertain the people there.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 32

June 21, 1938: From Mrs. Sturgeon; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “I enjoy your program so much each day…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter in which author suggests that the program reminds them of being back home in Big Bend, Texas.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 33

June 17, 1938: From Mrs. Lydia Thoma; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “We are so sorry you are leaving as we will miss you very much for we always looked forward for your time on the radio…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter wishing Woody and Lefty Lou the best of luck, stating how much the show will be missed, and a final request to hear “Nobody’s Darling.”

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 34

June 15, 1938: From Edward Pardue; Monrovia, California. Envelope & Letter. “I have bin listen to your programs for a long time and I would drather see any other program on the air leave as you and Lefty Lou [sic]…”

Re. three-page handwritten letter from man who has been in a sanatorium for 15 months and intentionally stays awake through a “rest period” to listen to the show. Author had wanted to send for a songbook but kept putting it off and fears that it is now too late. Requests to hear “Lonesome Valley” and wishes Woody and Lefty Lou the best of luck and hopes to hear them on the air again soon.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 35

May 23, 1938: From Mrs. Nameloc; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “I enjoy your program so much wish we had a world of people like you I must rule the paper this way or not write at all as I am loosing my sight [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter on folded stationary with one side manually lined by pencil and ruler. The letter describes the author’s imagining of how Woody and Lefty Lou look in real life and says they would give anything to see a photograph of the duo. Also mentions that the author had wanted to purchase a songbook but had lacked the funds to do so. Envelope has “reply when have time” written on it.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 36

No Date: From Mrs. M.M. Coleman; Los Angeles, California. Letter.

Re. one-page handwritten letter containing mostly indecipherable writing but mentions a Songbook, autobiography, and hoping to meet in heaven.

Box 02

Folder 37

May 02, 1938: From Alta Bobst; Anaheim, California. Envelope & Letter. “Received your song book and most welcome letter all i could say, my Goodness, my goodness it was such a surprise as i did not expect a personal letter [sic]…”

Re. three-page handwritten letter thanking Woody and Lefty Lou for sending a songbook along with a personalized letter. Author mentions that she has begun to reconsider the role of the mother-daughter relationship and wonders if Lefty Lou has had similar feelings. Also, asks Woody to sing “The Brooklyn Theater’s on Fire” and includes lyrics.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 38

February 17, 1938: From Maude Pickett, Daisy Pickett, & Tom Head; San Diego, California. Envelope & Letter. “Have been listening to you for 2 or 3 days…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter on folded stationary. Author recently rediscovered the radio show on a new station after having previously been a fan of the XELO broadcast. Also, requests to hear “Blue Eyes or Brown Eyes or what have you [sic].”

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 39

May 16, 1938: From Miss Maxine Kitchin; Glendale, California. Envelope & Letter. “I listen to your beautiful music every day…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter about how the author and her friends sit around the radio and cry along to the blues until they feel better listening to the show. Also, requests for “Dream of a Miners Child,” “My Pretty Blue Eyed Ellen, and “In the Baggage Coach Ahead.” (Written on envelope: “friend of Ruth’s”)

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 40

November 27, 1937: From Mrs. Irene Teters; Placentia, California. Envelope & Letter. “I am sending you the song…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter about the song “Black Sheep.” Author hopes that Woody and Lefty Lou will find some use for the song and also requests to hear “Missouri Waltz” on the harp.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 41

May 13, 1938: From Margaret Reed: Walnut, California. Envelope & Letter. “We like the song book just fine, but have been waiting and waiting for the song we requested for little Dickie Persons…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter requesting Woody and Lefty Lou sing “On the Jericho Road” for a sick, and growing sicker, six-year-old boy. Letter states that little Dickie Persons listens to the show every day and is saddened each day his name is absent from the program and that a simple mention would “bring a ray of happy joy” into his life.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 42

June 15, 1938: From Mr. & Mrs. John Vanderpool; Glendale, California. Envelope & Letter. “I just heard you say that you are leaving the air wave…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter from two Missouri migrants who relocated to California one year prior and found work on a ranch. The couple had recently purchased a radio and hardly missed a show. They wish Woody and Lefty Lou the best of luck traveling back east and request to hear “Sweet Fern.”

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 43

May 18, 1938: From Mrs. Bob Davidson; Chatsworth, California. Envelope & Letter. “I listen to your program everyday and sure do enjoy it…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter that contains three jokes about a name, where babies come from, and a sick horse. The author hopes the jokes are worthy of earning a songbook and also requests to hear “Empty Cot in the Bunk House Tonight.” “Skinny Horse” is written and underlined on the envelope.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 44

June 13, 1938: From Miss Billy Jerry; Tustin, California. Envelope & Letter. “I shure do like to here you all sing I wrote you all a little some time a go [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter with “When I Take My Vacation in Heaven” written on the back with full lyrics and chords. Letter requests that Woody and Lefty Lou play the song on June 15th for five-year-old baby Jene Jerry. Also, “Words: Vacation in Heaven” written and underlined on envelope.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 45

June 18, 1938: From M.L Clausing; Corona, California. Envelope & Letter. “Here’s one who would rather hear of any station signing off their stars than you two…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter that states the author is upset the show is ending. The author mentions that his wife is from the “Show Me State” and that his children were born there. He and his family have not missed a show in over nine months and request a snap-shot of Woody and Lefty Lou.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 46

February 24, 1938: From Irene Brown; Fullerton, California. Envelope & Letter. “Yes, we are here, at the other end listening and enjoying your songs…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter complaining about “Woodie’s” unnatural hillbilly act. The author acknowledges that the singing and playing of instruments are very good, however, the hillbilly act does not come across as genuine. The letter also requests to hear “Sing Brother Sing,” but states “don’t talk any more than necessary.”

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 47

June 15, 1938: From Blythe Sherman; El Monte, California. Envelope & Letter. “It was with deep regret that I heard your announcement on the radio a few minutes ago about your leaving the air waves…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter from fellow Oklahoma musician who moved to California one year prior. Author had tried to get air time on a radio station in Long Beach, but states that no openings were available at the time. Author mentions that they possess one songbook, but was saddened to hear that the “101 book” would not come out. Also mentions that if Woody takes the Southern Pacific Freights to keep an eye out for them.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 48

May 03, 1938. From: Mrs. Theo R. Gentry; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “I always tune in on your program every day…”

Re. four-page handwritten letter from former Oklahoma and Missouri resident. The letter relates a funny anecdote about the author and her family’s recent visit to Oklahoma and seeing a field of cattle. Letter also mentions intent to write again about a story concerning the McAlester penitentiary in Oklahoma. Also,”Good Funny Letter” written and underlined on envelope.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 49

January 17, 1939. From: Rosa Kelley; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “My beloved friend- I’m one of your friends that us to listen to you and Woody every day I thought you two were the best I ever heard on air…”

Re. three-page handwritten letter several months after the radio show ended. The author misses the program very much and remembers that Woody had mentioned his plans to head East while Lefty Lou was going to vacation in the mountains. The author thought the show would return but has not been able to find it again. She writes to find out if and where she can hear either Woody or Lefty Lou sing their songs and wishes them the very best.

Box 02

Folder 50

June 7, 1938: From RH Darman; Hollywood, California. Envelope & Letter. “I listen to your program every time I can so will send you a onest to go storey a good memory years a go…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter about the author’s wife awakening from a bad dream about snakes. The wife awoke and suddenly grabbed the man and began yelling at the “top of her vains [sic].” “A dream of snakes a humdinger” written and underlined on envelope.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 51

June 16, 1938: From Mr. & Mrs. Albert Nystion; Glendale, California. Envelope & Letter. “Am sorrie you all living us the radio I and my family have tuned in every day sence we know you were on the air [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter thanking Woody and Lefty Lou for their time on the air. The author mentions how much peace and joy their program has brought to the family and community and hopes that one day the duo will return.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 52

May 6, 1938: From J.D. Taylor and Wife; South Gate, California. Envelope & Letter. “Please send me a coppy of light I hope you will have a good piece in it about the early days of Okla [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from gentleman who crossed over the Red River from Texas into Oklahoma 47 years prior. Since that time the author had traveled all across Oklahoma and Arkansas. Author felt that he was born about “40 years to soon for this modern stuff [sic]” but enjoys the current program and requests to hear “Lobed Hairs.” Also, “Crossed Texas Line in a Hurry” written and underlined on envelope.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 53

January 6, 1938: From S. Edwards; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “I heard your sermons over the radio discussing the problem of shortage of houses for rent to people with children…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter about the issue of landlords being unwilling to rent property to families with children.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 54

April 26, 1938: From Dora Bohannan; Long Beach, California. Envelope & Letter. “I listen to your program every day & I sure do injoy hearing them I think Lefty Lue has a lovely voice but your program would be better if you could stay on the air a hour instead of half [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter about the author’s desire to win a Songbook by sending in a joke. Top of page has a staple hole, but there are no additional pages. The letter also requests to hear “Blue Eyes” for husband’s upcoming 25th birthday.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 55

September 16, 1937: From Elsie Lyman; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “I stumbled across your program one morning by accident, and now I wouldn’t miss it for anything…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from a recent fan who has been listening to the program for close to one month and thinks it is “tops.” Author suggests that when Woody and Lefty Lou sing it is as if they are “singing to each of [their] listeners individually.” Also, requests to hear “When it’s Springtime in the Rockies” and includes postage in return for a cartoon. “Stamp” written and underlined on envelope.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 56

January 07, 1938: From Alta Conlding; Inglewood, California. Envelope & Letter. “I’ve been wondering about something ever since a week ago Monday, and you could perhaps explain it…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter on stationary. The author had previously written to Woody and Lefty Lou requesting to hear “Cowboy’s Heaven” for their birthday, however, on that date the duo played “The Letter Edged in Black” instead. Coincidentally, the author received word around the same time that a former acquaintance had been shot and killed. The author cannot get over the feeling that the song and event are connected. “Letter Edged in Black” written on Envelope.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 57

November 03, 1937: From Little Bussie, Big Bussie, Mary, and Grandma & Grandpa Crissman; Glendale, California. Envelope & Letter. “We listen to your program all the time and injoy it very much [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from Crissman family. Request to hear Woody play “Freight Train Blues” on his harp and for Missouri (Lefty Lou) to sing “Clover Blossom” during the night broadcast. Letter also mentions their new two-month-old-boy. “From the family” written on envelope.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 58

September 21, 1937: From Mrs. Lula Pigman; Corona, California. Envelope & Letter. “I have been listening to your programs every morning and sure think they are wonderful, and sure are proud of them…”

Re. three-page handwritten letter from former resident of Stigler, Oklahoma. Author does not own a radio but goes to neighbor’s home every morning to listen to the program. Requests to hear “The Little Girl Dressed in Blue.”

KFBD

Box 02

Folder 59

March 18, 1938: From Mrs. Edith V. Nixon; Monrovia, California. Envelope & Letter. “I haven’t wrote to you in a long time I always tough through I have been sick and in the hospital 14 day’s I had just been home a week when the flood came it washed my house away & every thing we had but the radio & 5 hen’s [sic]…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter from a sick mother of 7 whose home was recently damaged by a flood. The author has been a longtime listener and had written to Woody and Lefty Lou several times before and previously purchased a songbook. Most of her household possessions were ruined or lost during a flood, including the songbook, and she would like another copy, if possible. Also, she requests to hear “Gathering Flowers from the Hillside.” “Send a Book!!” is written and underlined on the envelope.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 60

September 7, 1937: From Estelle Jacobs; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “You tell ‘that man’ who thought you were sore last night because you didn’t get on at 10:30 sharp that you weren’t the only one who was sore…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter commenting on a previous show’s timing error. The author comments that she very much appreciates the routine of both falling asleep and waking up to someone she greatly admires (“some one meaning both of you”). Also, requests to hear “When I Take My Vacation in Heaven,” “Beneath the Maple on the Hill,” or “Mama Blues,” and encloses a 3 cent stamp for a copy of “The Chinese and the Japs” lyric sheet.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 61

June 17, 1938: From Agnes Macdonald; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “Before you go on your vacation, want to tell you how much I have enjoyed your singing on the radio…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter wishing Woody and Lefty Lou a wonderful vacation. The author writes that the sweetness and simplicity is not only a pleasure, but an inspiration. She enclosed a blank check for $1.00 to be cashed and spent during the vacation. “$1.00 check” written and underlined on envelope.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 62

November 30, 1937: From Estelle Jacobs; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “Received your sweet letter and what a pleasant surprise…”

Re. four-page handwritten letter from fan delighted to have received a response to her previous letter. The author acknowledges that an ongoing correspondence with Lefty Lou is probably difficult and little more than a dream, though she is delighted to have had this much interaction so far. The author talks about her prior and upcoming surgery and how much joy the radio show brings her every day.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 63

March 2, 1938: From Jack; Newport Beach, California; Envelope & Letter. “I am crazy about your program and don’t miss a one…”

Re. single-page typed letter from gentleman who is pleased to learn that Woody and Lefty Lou have become interested in Astrology. He requests to hear Lefty Lou sing “The Cowboy’s Lament” and states that he loves her voice but tells Woody “your voice is more adapted to calling hogs.” He ends the letter telling the duo he is skeptical of his wife’s faithfulness to him and gives her birth date. He asks the duo to share their advice or opinion on the air. “Astrology” and “Good Letter” written on envelope.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 64

April 21, 1938: From Alta Bobst; Anaheim, California. Envelope & Letter. “This letter is not wrote in style but never the less it will bring to you the message that you and Lefty will love to hear…”

Re. one-page letter handwritten along with one-page lyric sheet handwritten (both on stationary). Letter addresses how wonderful the author thinks the program is and questions if he submits lyrics to Woody, would it be possible for him to create a “tune” to go along with the words. The lyrics are included on a separate sheet of stationary paper along with a short note. “Send Book,” is written and underlined on envelope.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 65

January 24, 1938: From Miss Betty Bahl; Medicine Hat, Alberta. Envelope & Letter. “at, ale-scale-scarce-care-dare-rare-year…”

Re. six-page handwritten letter that consists of rhyming  words that are separated by dashes.

XELO

Box 02

Folder 66

November 5, 1937: From Allan Favre; Gibbs, Saskatchewan. Envelope & Letter. “Upon hearing you after on your program…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter requesting a copy of the Old Time Hillbilly songbook. Author encloses 5 cents as payment.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 67

November 11, 1937: From Leo Engst; Macleod, Alberta. Envelope & Letter. “Well here goes for another letter from Canada…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from a Canadian listener. Author mentions that they especially enjoyed hearing the song about “There’s more pretty gals than one” and would like to get a copy of the music and lyrics if possible or a copy of the Hill Billy Songbook.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 68

October 25, 1937: From Margie Wells; Long Beach, California. Envelope & Letter. “As, tonight, I heard your program back on the air, I will write to let you know that you have another sincere listener…”

Re. three-page handwritten letter from woman who just moved from Little Rock, Arkansas, two days prior and could occasionally pick up the program back home. Requests to hear “Just Because” for her sister’s upcoming birthday and “Put My Little Shoes Away” for her mother and if, possible, to play the dedications during both the morning and evening broadcast. “Have 11 pm program in Ark.” written on envelope.

KFVD

Box 02

Folder 69

November 28, 1937: From George Hartley; Elwood, Indiana. Envelope & Letter. “I listened to your program about your distant listeners on November 26 at 1:30 a.m. …”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from gentleman living fifty miles northeast of Indianapolis. Requests to hear “Corinne” for his wife.

KFBD

Box 02

Folder 70

November 6, 1937: From Paul Hennington; Lubbock, Texas. Envelope & Letter. “I am inclosing stamp…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter request for “song that is now being printed” and author states that he listens to the program every night and enjoys it very much.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 01

March 15, 1938: From Maudean Lonesome and Blue. Lancaster, California. Envelope & Letter. “As I listen to you boys every day…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from a lonesome and homesick nurse. Author mentions that their mother’s family comes from Oklahoma and currently feels very alone. Requests to hear “St. Louis Blues” and a postscript mentions wanting to meet the Woody and Lefty Lou in person, or, at the very least, obtain a photograph of the two.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 02

June 13, 1938: From Mrs. A.I. Ostergand; Hollywood, California. Envelope & Letter. “You may think I am making this up, but that is not as what I am about to tell you is true…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter with oil painting on envelope and top half of stationary. Author just heard on the program that the duo are having a “dream story contest” and wants to share their anecdote. Letter tells the story of the author’s father working at a mine in Ophir, Utah when her mother dreamed about an accident. The father, worried by this predication left work early, and later that day an accident occurred at the mine killing two workers.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 03

June 18, 1938: From Florence A. Pearson & Myrtle A. Pearson; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter.

Re. single-page typed letter: “We have had the pleasure of hearing your excellent radio programs recently and sincerely hope you will be back on the air here again soon.”

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 04

June 17, 1938: From Mrs. Barbara Wilson; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter.

Re. one-page handwritten letter: “I sure enjoy your home spun philosophy, and am very sorry your [sic] going away — Hoping you’ll be back soon.”

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 05

January 19, 1938: From Edith Nixon; Arcadia, California. Envelope & Letter. “I am still a steady listener of your’s and enjoy your programs more all the time it is really some thing just to turn the dial and hear you singing…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter on stationary. Author writes about how wonderful it is to hear the program each morning as she gets her children ready for school. Author has 4 children in school and another married and living in Louisiana and requests to hear “Maple on the Hill.” Author writes that she is including “the words of a old song.” “WORDS: JUST A PLAIN WORKING GIRL” is written on envelope.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 06

February 23, 1938: From Mrs. Sadie Mayberry; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “Yes Woody your hoopsnake story is true fifty years ago six miles south of McKinney Texas, I was a little girl ten years old [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter telling an anecdote about a hoopsnake encounter in Texas. The author states that she and her dog were attacked by a snake that was capable of putting its head over its tail, forming a hoop, and rolling around. After an hour of hiding behind a tree, the author and her brother killed and skinned the snake and made a hat out of its skin.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 07

June 16, 1938: From Mrs. Robert Borders; Riverside, California. Envelope & Letter. “We listen to your program each day and are indeed sorry to hear you say you are going off the air…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from a family of dedicated listeners. Author mentions that their family listens to the program as often as possible and hopes that it will return soon, but wishes Woody and Lefty Lou the best during their vacation and time away.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 08

January 08, 1938: From Mrs. Rex Byerlee; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “Enclosed you will find .10$ for which please send me a sample of Sabracin & song book [sic]…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter discussing the issue of landlords not renting property to families with children and how difficult the issue was with the author’s family situation. The author hopes that Woody will “keep up the good work and maybe you will touch some of these land lords hearts [sic].” Author is also from Oklahoma and homesick and wonders if the duo is too and requests “Barbara Allen” for husband.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 09

January 25, 1938: From Mrs. Jennie J. Skewer; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “You rascals…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter addressing Woody and Lefty Lou’s move to KFVD. Letter addresses a series of topics from previous shows on former station and requests to hear “Maple on the Hill.”

XELO

Box 03

Folder 10

June 15, 1938: From Mrs. Ramona Greiner; Baldwin Park, California. Envelope & Letter. “I am sure sorry to here that you are going away I sure like your singing so much [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter stating how much they will miss the program. Author wishes Woody and Lefty Lou the best of luck while they are away from the program and wonders if it would be possible to receive a photograph of the duo.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 11

June 17, 1938: From The Ray Struter Family; Lynwood, California. Envelope & Letter. “As I listen to your program nearly every day I heard the announcement that Saturday will be your last day on the air over KFVD…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter stating how upset the author, family, and friends are about the program ending. Author mentions that they had written once before to request a song, but missed a few programs and is uncertain if the song was ever played. They wish Woody and Lefty Lou the best of luck on their vacation and hope that the program returns soon.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 12

June 20, 1938: From Mable Helmich; Santa Ana, California. Envelope & Letter. “I’m writing to you because I think you are two swell singers…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter on stationary from 16-year-old fan. Author wishes the Woody and Lefty Lou could be on the air today and for every day from then on, but hopes that the duo have a happy vacation. “16 years old” written and underlined on envelope.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 13

January 4, 1938: From Mr. William Jaliver; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “I listen in on your program all the time and injoy them very much but this land lord business is the best yet [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter addressing the issue of landlords who are unwilling to rent property to families with children. The author currently has a 13-year-old daughter living with him and had trouble finding a landlord who would rent to him even though he had a good job. The author also mentions that he is originally from Oklahoma and is 100% behind Woody and his messages.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 14

June 15, 1938: From Mrs. Taylor; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “I am sure sorry you are leaving our city and all your friends you have made since broadcasting…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter on stationary. Author writes about being a faithful listener, never missing a program, and how sad she is to hear that the show is ending. Author proposes an open invitation to dinner anytime for Woody and Lefty Lou.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 15

June 16, 1938: From Miss Hattie J. Owen; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “I have listened to you ever since you first started to broadcast on the air…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from fan who has recently been busy and missed several programs. The author could not find the program at the regularly scheduled time and is writing to find out if the show has a new time-slot.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 16

December 08, 1937: From Raymond Martin; Reno, Nevada. Envelope & Letter. “Naow I vent and dun hit [sic]…”

Re. one-page typed letter from rancher who borrowed a friend’s typewriter. Author mentions needing a “ditchunary” several times throughout correspondence and tells anecdotes about life on the Sunshine Ranch in Reno, living in Texas, and other Western experiences. Author says that finding KFVD and the Woody & Lefty Lou Radio Show is like a cure for his rheumatism.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 17

No Date: From Raymond Martin. Letter with Lyrics.

Re. one-page typed letter with lyrics for “Cowboy from Tuneville” and “Garden of Friendship.” Short message reads: “There I surprised yuh. I wrote it cause Baile did’nt want tuh. Darn fine job too. If you want tuh. recite hit over the radio. Dedicate it to “Cactus Kate.” Please do thaet and I’ll send you a Xmas card [sic].” (Note: Xmas card is located in Box 3 Folder 27)

Box 03

Folder 18

January 30, 1938: From Raymond Martin; Reno, Nevada. Envelope & Letter. “Shure and I war xtra glad tuh here frum yuh all [sic]…”

Re. two-page typed letter writing about Buck Evans and the possibility of being related. The author writes that he is enclosing photographs of himself and would like if Woody and Lefty Lou would send theirs in return. (Note: pictures are not located in this file, however, a similar correspondence letter and photographs can be found in Box 11 folder 2 and Box 5 Folder 42). “$1.00 3 Stamps” written and underlined on envelope.

XELO

Box 03

Folder 19

December 16, 1937: From Raymond Martin; Reno, Nevada. Envelope & Letter. “Jest cantered up frum off the range to saye hulloe and haw arr yuh [sic]…”

Re. one-page typed letter asking about the price of cheese in Dixie. The author has previously corresponded with Woody and Lefty Lou and was disappointed that they did not play his song request on the previous show. Letter asks about exchanging photographs and how to purchase songbooks.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 20

December 03, 1937: From Martin Fornell; Reno, Nevada. Envelope & Letter. “Excuse me for troubling you folks so often but I wish to make a special request in the asking of the singing of, “Night time in Nevada…”

Re. one-page typed letter requesting to hear songs for a friend, an inquiry into Woody’s artwork and style (the author would like an 8×10 picture of a prairie scene for $5), and an invitation to stay at the Dog House (a refuge  for divorced men) in Reno if Woody is ever in town. The author mentions that too many programs on KFVD waste time with “relating there ideas of life [sic]” and should stick to playing music.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 21

September 26, 1937: From Martin Fornell; Reno, Nevada. Envelope & Letter. “Sure glad to hear your programs…”

Re. two-page typed letter suggesting that the program should be longer. Author mentions that the previous show ended abruptly before “Rancho Grande” could be played and requests to hear it soon. Also, requests to hear “Little Mohee” and another song which the author cannot remember but types out several lines of lyrics. Postscript notes that a stamp has been enclosed for a copy of lyrics to “The Chinese and the Japs.” “Stamp,” written and underlined on envelope.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 22

January 24, 1938: From Raymond Martin; Reno, Nevada. Envelope & Letter. “Hyah Pards! Shure, and hit war a powah full long tyme cense eye herd yuh lass [sic]…”

Re. one-page typed letter on stationary asking for more information about how to acquire Songbooks. Author mentions that he appreciates receiving a response to a previous letter, but would still like to exchange “picksures” and suggests that he will be sending one of his own. Author also tells anecdotes about ranch life and buzzards.

XELO

Box 03

Folder 23

April 11, 1938: From Slim MacDonald; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “Here’s to you and yours- from an Oklahoma cowhand who was in the Cherokee Run…”

Re. three-page handwritten letter from former Oklahoma resident who took part in the 1893 Land Run. Author reminiscences about life in Oklahoma and the wild berries, persimmon, and pecan trees. Author also writes short description of hoopsnakes and requests to hear “In the Rock Candy Mountain.”

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 24

October 29, 1937: From Martin Fornell; Reno, Nevada. Envelope & Letter. “Thanks ever a lot for the consideration shown the post-card poem I sent you [sic]…”

Re. single-page typed letter appreciative of Woody and Lefty Lou reading a previous postcard message on air. Author is also pleased that the duo performed a song about Reno and believes that it will inspire and bring joy to others in the city.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 25

April 12, 1938: From Paul F. Hill; Saugus, California. Envelope & Letter. “Would you care to make some announcement regarding the 13th Annual Hill’s Ranch Rodeo at Saugus, April 23 and April 24th on the same basis as you announced the Great Western Rodeo last December…”

Re. single-page typed letter on stationary with printed image of a cowboy on a bucking bronco. Author requests that Woody and Lefty Lou promote an upcoming rodeo, and in exchange for the advertisement, offers 12 complimentary tickets. This request is based on a previous exchange when the duo promoted the Great Western Rodeo.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 26

No Date: From Paul F. Hill; Saugus, California. Rodeo Ticket & Letter. “The 12th annual Great Western Rodeo, scheduled for next Friday…”

Re. single-page typed suggested radio announcement for Great Western Rodeo promotion. Letter is hand-signed with message “Enclosed 12 passes Good any day.” Single yellow ticket is included in folder.

Box 03

Folder 27

December 16, 1937: From Martin Fornell; Reno, Nevada. Envelope, Letter, & Christmas Card. “A load of best wishes…”

Re. painted and carved copper plate Christmas card that depicts a man leading a donkey through desert. Also includes a short handwritten message on cardboard wishing happiness and prosperity.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 28

November 24, 1937: From Baile Matthews; Reno, Nevada. Envelope & Letter. “Enjoy your programs as ever but am losing a portion of my interest in your style of entertainment…”

Re. one-page typed letter addressing the use of Woody’s “French Harp” to imitate hillbilly music. The author writes that they are fans of the program, especially the guitar and banjo numbers, but will turn off the radio whenever they hear the harp. The author states that many fans may enjoy the harp and that it’s best to please the majority, but Woody and Lefty Lou would be better off giving it up. “READ!” and “Harp” written on envelope.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 29

November 27, 1937: From Baile Matthews; Reno, Nevada. Envelope & Letter. “My compliments on the most modest and refined way that you received my contradictions on your programs…”

Re. one-page typed letter addressing the on air response to a previous letter criticizing the use of Woody’s French Harp and hillbilly music. The author feels as if they may have been too critical in their previous letter and were surprised by how well Woody and Lefty Lou responded to the letter on air. The author asks if the duo are familiar with Martin & Roberts or the Doc Roberts Trio. Also, compliments “Brown Eyes,” “The Convict and the Rose,” and requests to hear “That’s Why I’m Blue When it Rains.”

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 30

December 17, 1937: From Mr. Earnest Walters; Sparks, Nevada. Envelope & Letter. “As a true friend and admirer for many weeks I have taken the liberty of your welfare and progress as apart from the average…”

Re. two-page typed letter in red ink. Author writes to suggest that the program has progressively worsened over the past few months. The author mentions one specific program “where a fellow criticized your harp” and “he was right.” Author suggests that Woody and Lefty Lou sing more songs like “Nobody’s Darling,” Weeping Willow Tree,” “Prisoner’s Dream,” and “Down in the Little Green Valley.”

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 31

November 10, 1937: From Pauline Williamson; Fallon, Nevada. Envelope & Letter. “I am still listening to your nightly broadcast I can’t get the station at morning…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter from former Texas resident who loves hillbilly songs. Author is enclosing payment and a 3 cent stamp for two songbooks. One book is for their son who is 16 and plays the fiddle, guitar, and works on a ranch 19 miles away. “2 Books” written and underlined on envelope.

KFBD

Box 03

Folder 32

January 27, 1938: From Edward H Rogers; Tonopah, Nevada. Envelope & Letter. “I hail from Oklahoma too, I listen to your programs every night…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from fellow former Oklahoma musician. Author writes that they “used to toot a jug” in a hillbilly band at station K.A.D.A. in Ada, Oklahoma, and requests to hear “Corina” and “Old Faithful.”

XELO

Box 03

Folder 33

September 29, 1937: From F.A. Clark; Truckee, California. Envelope & Letter. “Dear folks inclosed find stamps for the Jap song [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from fan who listens to the program nightly at 11 on KFBD. The letter is a follow up to a previous correspondence which requested a lyric sheet, but had forgotten to include payment or postage.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 34

October 30, 1937: From F.A. Clark; Truckee, California. Envelope & Letter. “Well I just got on the air in time to hear your program tonite [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from fan commenting on previous correspondence with Woody and Lefty Lou. Author writes that their town is only 34 miles from Reno and knows many people who are fans of the program but are too shy to write in. Requests a copy of lyrics to “that Reno song.”

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 35

September 21, 1937: From F.A. Clark; Truckee, California. Envelope & Letter. “Well I am away up here on top of the high Sierras near Lake Tahoe…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from a fan who thinks Woody and Lefty Lou are the best on the air. The author writes to see how they could acquire copies “The Chinese and the Japs,” “all the good old cowboy songs,” and “Maple on the Hill.” Author also includes lyrics to a song he would like to hear the duo sing on the air.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 36

October 27, 1937: From Monroe Bailey; Wilson Creek, Washington. Envelope & Letter. “Your music last night was grand, I wish I had heard all the Tennessee piece the lady sang but I only heard the last part [sic]…”

Re. one-page typed letter from former Oklahoma resident. Author suggests this is the first time they have ever written to a radio station before, but could not resist after hearing “the lady singin.” Author has enclosed 10 cents for a copy of “The Chinese and the Japs” and swears to tell all his Oklahoma friends about the program.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 37

November 9, 1937: From Monroe Bailey; Wilson Creek, Washington. Envelope & Letter. “Dialing in at 11 00 PM last evening, I understand, must make request for the Old Time pieces, quickly, otherwise I will be like Dan Tucker, too late…”

Re. one-page typed letter from recent fan who would like to hear a parody song that they recall from their time in Oklahoma. The author is unsure if the song was composed randomly by an individual in Oklahoma and forgotten, or, is a verifiable piece. They briefly describe the song and request to hear it if Woody or Lefty Lou know it.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 38

November 14, 1937: From Monroe Bailey; Wilson Creek, Washington. Envelope & Letter. “May thanks, to Woody and Lestie Lou. for the dedication of the piece Friday evening November 12th [sic]…”

Re. one-page typed letter thanking the duo for honoring a previous letter’s request. Author writes that they try to listen to the program every night at 11 PM, but accidentally slept through the previous show and will start setting alarms. Author requests to hear “the Lullaby, or known as the Old Missouri Waltz.”

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 39

November 16, 1937: From Monroe Bailey; Wilson Creek, Washington. Envelope & Letter. “I was a last night listener, to KFVD- and was surprised again, Many thanks for The Red River Valley…”

Re. one-page typed letter thanking Woody and Lefty Lou for acknowledging the author’s previous letter and request on air. Author congratulates the duo on securing a contract, but mentions that the broadcast fades in and out at times. Author ends letter suggesting they will be passing through Los Angeles at the beginning of year on their way to Stillwater, Oklahoma and if they write too much to let them know.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 40

November 28, 1937: From Monroe Bailey; Wilson Creek, Washington. Envelope & Letter. “Received the song book, very thankful for the same, Also to Lady Lou, for the piece she dedicated to me Friday night [sic]…”

Re. one-page typed letter addressing a recent program when Woody read a letter by another man named Bailey from Reno that criticized the French Harp. The author disagrees with the man from Reno about the French Harp and suggests that “now days the ones who can play one is very scarce [sic]” and that playing it creates a link to the past. The author also says that back in the days of pre-statehood, people in Oklahoma only had access to string music or French Harps.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 41

No Date: From Art Howland; Los Angeles, California. Letter. “Well, I’ve listened to you for a long time now and this is my first letter to you…”

Re. three-page handwritten letter requesting to hear Lefty Lou sing “Reno Valley.” Author offers to play guitar for the duo and claims their life goal is to play guitar and harmonica for in an old time band. Author also includes a joke which they hope will be worthy of receiving a songbook.

Box 03

Folder 42

October 26, 1937: From Mr. & Mrs. Mike Rodgers; Port Townsend, Washington. Envelope & Letter. “In answer to your question ‘do we like you?’ we want to say we sure do…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from couple in Washington who listen to the program every night. The author requests to hear “Birmingham Jail” and wishes their radio would pick up the signal for the morning program.

KFBD

Box 03

Folder 43

January 26, 1938: From Mr. & Mrs. Elsworth Dickson; Ellensberg, Washington. Envelope & Letter. “Oh! how we do enjoy you…”

Re. three-page handwritten letter from husband and wife who were born and raised in Arkansas and Kansas. They have family in Oklahoma and wonder where in OK Woody was born. They request Woody and Lefty Lou to play “Maple on the Hill” and for Whitey to play “Sleep Baby Sleep” or “My Dear Old Southern Home.”

XELO

Box 03

Folder 44

January 30, 1938: From Vernon L. Richards; Klamath Falls, Oregon. Envelope & Letter. “Lefty Lou I would like very much to hear you and you alone sing…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter addressed to Lefty Lou from a left handed admirer. The author offers to exchange photographs with Lefty, once they can get a hold of their own, but gives a brief description of himself regardless. The author ends the letter hoping to continue the correspondence.

XELO

Box 03

Folder 45

January 30, 1938: From the Lee Marshall Family; Medford, Oregon. Envelope & Letter. “We listen to your program and like it fine…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter addressed to Woody, Lefty Lou, and Buck Evans. The author is writing in response to the program lacking a name and suggests “Restful Melodies” would be a fitting title. The author also requests to hear “Birmingham Jail,” “Brown Eyes,” and “Maple on the Hill.”

XELO

Box 03

Folder 46

November 6, 1937: From Mrs. Ross McElroy; Buena, Washington. Envelope & Letter. “We sure like to hear your programs my husband & I he goes to work at the sugar factory at midnight so you see we can listen to you before he goes…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from former Tulsa, Oklahoma resident. Author writes requesting to hear “When it’s Round Up Time in Heaven” and asks about acquiring a songbook.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 47

November 3, 1937: From A.M. Shugley; Walla Walla, Washington. Envelope & Letter. “Find inclose a U.S. 3c postage stamp for which send me your book of old songs…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter requesting to hear “The Chinese and the Japs.” Author wonders whether Woody and Lefty Lou are married, siblings, or father and daughter. The author then describes how they imagine the duo look in real life.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 48

January 21, 1938: From The gang at Costleys; Clovis, New Mexico. Envelope & Letter.

Re. “Will you please dedicate a number to the boys at Costleys bakery. We listen to your program each night and enjoy it. Please play If you can’t get five take two [sic]…”

XELO

Box 03

Folder 49

November 5, 1937: From Wallace Hall; French Creek, Idaho. Envelope & Letter. “Heard your program last night…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter requesting a songbook and for Woody and Lefty Lou to play “Mother the Queen of My Heart.”

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 50

January 30, 1938: From Henry Myers & Family; Toppenish, Washington. Envelope & Letter. “You said tear off a piece of wallpaper so here it is…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter written on floral wallpaper print with price guide on back. Author writes to complain about the advertisers on the program and requests to hear “Put My Little Shoes Away” and “The Chinese and the Japs.”

XELO

Box 03

Folder 51

November 28, 1937: From Mary E. Jackson; Paonia, Colorado. Envelope & Letter. “Heard your program Sat night and enjoyed it very much…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter “trying for the picture” and wishing their friends all the world’s luck and happiness.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 52

October 27, 1937: From Mrs. Kay Rhoaden; Butte, Montana. Envelope & Letter. “I was tuned to K.F.V.D. last evening when you came on the air…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter from former Mississippi resident and fan of hillbilly music. Author states that they will do everything they can to keep the program on the air and hopes that other fans will write and do the same. Also, requests to hear “Silver Haired Daddy of Mine.”

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 53

November 6, 1937: From Mr. & Mrs. O.F. Ford; Rock Springs, Wyoming. Envelope & Letter. “We listen to your program every night and enjoy them very much…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter from couple who live 107 miles from town. They request to hear “Somewhere in Old Wyoming” and wish their radio picked up the morning program instead of only receiving the evening broadcast.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 54

April 12, 1938: From Lew Dimmitt; Powell, Missouri. Envelope & Letter. “You will no doubt be surprised to get a letter from me…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from old Missouri friend. Author writes to thank Woody and Lefty Lou for a couple songbooks and explains that they have given several copies to their friends. The author is currently living in a secluded park in the Ozarks and no longer receives a radio signal, but hopes that the program is doing well.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 55

December 8, 1937: From Mrs. A.S. Blough; Butler, Missouri. Envelope & Letter. “I picked up your radio station about 11:30 PT Friday night and heard you mention something about sending something to the one who wrote to your station from the greatest distance…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter from Missouri fan attempting to win an unidentified prize. The author recounts a few prior shows and songs that Woody and Lefty Lou played. The author also requests for more information concerning upcoming Christmas and New Year’s radio greetings.

KFVD

Box 03

Folder 56

April 28, 1938: From Mr. & Mrs. Dick Aeers; Inola, Oklahoma. Envelope & Letter. “Please sing & play some good request for my sister Mr & Mrs Ron Cann & little Doris Bell at Tehachapi Calif they are from Inola. Oklahom [sic]…”

KFVD: “via air mail” written and underlined on envelope.

Box 03

Folder 57

October 30, 1937: From Mr. & Mrs. Brice Carroll; Tulsa, Oklahoma. Envelope & Letter. “Enjoyed your program very much…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter to “suggest Jericco Road for your Song Book [sic]” and requests that it is played for their mother in Los Angeles.

Box 03

Folder 58

May 03, 1938: From S.T. Baker; Beggs, Oklahoma. Envelope & Letter. “Am sorry I can’t hear your programs from here…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from Oklahoma resident who had been in California the previous winter. Author writes that they had visited with their good friend Raymond Stone and requests that the duo play “any good numbers” for Mr. & Mrs. Stone and Mrs. Darman Ray’s mother.

KFVD

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Folder 01

December 9, 1937: From Agnes and Bob; Van Horn, Texas. Envelope & Letter. “Of all the songs we hear you sing, it’s mighty hard to choose; we like the jolly ones a’ course, and e’en the lonesome blues [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter on Hotel Capitan stationary author requests to hear “My Blue Eyed Jane” for their blue eyed friend. On the back of stationary is note that reads: “We only have a quarter, but we’d love to have a book; count this a down payment – we’ll ship our Chinese cook.” “Send Book” and “Sent” written on envelope.

KFVD

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Folder 02

March 22, 1938: From Zagorski, Towler, Bloodsworth, Peters, Kemmel, Stallard, Free, Hodges, Skowkoski, & Burnett; San Pedro, California. “Please play something for the gang on The U.S.S.Y.O.24… We enjoy your program very much… Many good wishes for future success… And thanks for past entertainment…”

Read=Sent” and “Send words to Horse Neck Blues” written on envelope.

 

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Folder 03

November 29, 1937: From Mrs. Carl Kennedy; San Diego, California. Envelope & Letter. “Enclosed you will find (10c) ten cents in coin for which you will please send sample of Salrocin, and song book which I am anxiously awaiting…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter from author whose husband heard a recent program and began wondering if Woody was the same Woody, or Woodrow, that had grown up in Okemah, Oklahoma. The author writes about Woody playing the guitar at age 12 and helping other children with arithmetic. Also, requests to hear “Soldiers Joy.” “Knew Woody at age 12” is written and circled on envelope.

KFVD

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Folder 04

March 9, 1938: From Mr H. Vinton; Los Angeles, California. Envelope, Letter, & Sketch. “Please play the Rip-Saw Blues on that wonderful Harmonica of yours [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter with sketch drawing of workers at a lumber mill across bottom of paper. Letter addressed to Billy and Lefty Lou from 70 year old former lumber mill worker homesick form Arkansas. Author requests to hear “If or Not.” “Sketch! Sawmill picture” and “Old timer lumberman 70 years old” written on envelope.

KFVD

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Folder 05

January 27, 1938: From Tom L. Simmons; Paicines, California. Envelope & Letter. “Just Listened to your dedication a song to me [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter addressed to Whitey – Wood & Lou from former lead ranch hand who had worked in Oklahoma, Texas, and New Mexico between 1898-1906. Author thinks the group has an “old time” sound and requests to hear “Towards Mexico the Hard Road On.” “Old cowhand rode range 1898 to 1906” written on envelope.

XELO

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Folder 06

January 19, 1938: From C.R. Robinson; Beverly Hills, California. Envelope & Letter. “Just a line thanking you for all the nice hill billy music you have been playing…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter on The Beverly Wilshire Apartment-Hotel stationary. Author requests to hear “Red River Valley.”

KFVD

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Folder 07

May 03, 1938: From Loren Edmon; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “For two blue moons I have been intending to write and let you know how your singin affects me [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter with joke on back of page. Author was born in Shawnee, Oklahoma and is homesick and asks that the program takes it easy on the Oklahoma songs. Author has been sick for four months and trying to save money but is struggling and hopes that a songbook will still be available when they have a quarter. Author includes a joke about pink lemonade on back of letter. “Homesick for Okla” written and underlined on envelope.

KFVD

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Folder 08

March 02, 1938: From John P. Morrow; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “I heard yesterday for the first time your program over KFVD…”

Re. one-page typed letter on Unity Unfolding-Truth Institute stationary from former Tennessee resident who finds Woody and Lefty Lou’s southern style charming. Author writes that their music is too good to be taught, though they suspect that Woody may be bashful because of his low singing tone. Also, requests to hear “Daddy Don’t Go to the Mines Today.”

KFVD

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Folder 09

June 17, 1938: From Mrs. J.A. Collins; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “I wrote you a letter Wed. evening when you said on the radio you were leaving soon and I thought Thurs- would be the last broadcast [sic]…”

Re-one page handwritten letter from woman who had wanted to write a letter for a birthday request but waited too long. Author is upset Woody and Lefty Lou are leaving the air and wants her husband to take one day off of work so they can sit together and hear the final broadcast. Author wonders about Woody and Lou’s relationship –if they are siblings, married, or just friends– and requests to hear “Just Once Again.”

KFVD

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Folder 10

January 16, 1938: From Mr & Mrs Ray Strange; Bell Flowers, California. Envelope & Letter. “Just another request we heard the cattle call last night sure was fine [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from couple who have a son that also plays on the radio, station KFOX, in Long Beach, every afternoon at 3:15 and 6:15. Author, also requests to hear “The Lost Indian.” “Geo Strange’s mother & father” written and underlined on envelope.

KFVD

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Folder 11

October 28, 1937: From Mrs. Myrtle Keys; Long Beach, California. Envelope & Letter. “You tell that will be sponsor that your dern tootin we want you to stay on the air [sic]…”

Re. three-page handwritten letter addressed to Woody, Lefty Lou, and Gang Hi Pals. Author states that they never miss a program but became worried when the Pol Boys recently took over Woody and Lou’s usual time slot. Author was happy to hear the duo return, tells Lou to “never do that again,” and requests to hear “Cattle Call” and “Lonesome Valley.”

KFV

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Folder 12

February 27, 1938: From Mrs. W.A. Huff; Long Beach, California. Envelope & Letter. “Since you asked me to write I will do it and say I like your program and hope when you get a sponsor he won’t hog all the time…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter criticizing the overabundance of advertising and sponsorship in media and how it influences an individual’s decision making. The author does not want to be mentioned by name on air, but will be referred to as “76,” if necessary. Author requests to hear “Red River Valley,” “Nobody’s Darling but Mine,” and “Long Long Ago.” “Don’t mention name” written and underlined on envelope.

KFVD

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Folder 13

March 22, 1938: From Mrs. E.M.C.; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “My much understood and appreciated Hillbillys…”

Re. four-page handwritten letter from woman who just discovered the program and feels inspired. Author states that knowing the radio is there is like having a familiar friend and the program gives the author hope to some day have a similar voice.

KFVD

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Folder 14

April 27, 1938: From Anonymous; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “Dear soft singing friends I hear your program nearly every day (love it) and wish I could send money for both your songs and your paintings…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter from 74 year-old widow who has raised 7 boys -3 sets of twins- and all but 1 “was gun fodder for Uncle Sam.” Author is “alone and on charity” but too proud to let neighbors know about the situation so they want to keep their identity anonymous. Author includes a joke on additional sheet of paper and hopes to continue correspondence because it would bring light to some of their suffering. “Reply” and “Send Book” written on envelope.

KFVD

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Folder 15

September 28, 1937: From Emeline & Don; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “Well Woody heres that letter, we was telling you about, when my wife & my sister & I was over, to see you all Tues [sic]…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter from husband and wife who had recently visited Woody and Lou at the Crissman household. The author asks that “Lefty’s” mother not hold any hard feelings against him for a slight misunderstanding. Requests to hear “My Little Darling Pal of Mine” and asks to schedule another time for all the friends to get together.

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Folder 16

February 22, 1938: From B.J. Riemke; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “I listen to your program every day and I sure think it is the best on the air…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from listener who discovered program four weeks prior and reminds the author of being back home in Tennessee. Requests to hear “Wild Wood Flower” and tells Woody not to let people give him a hard time about hoopsnakes because the author has seen plenty before. “Hoop Snake” written on envelope.

KFVD

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Folder 17

March 24, 1938: From Rosemary Gretchen Ducker; San Jacinto, California. Envelope & Letter. “We think your programme could be better if [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter about how natural and authentic the program appears. The author is thankful that Woody and Lefty Lou are not getting “jazzy- like the rest of the hillbilly programmes [sic]” and hope that they keep it up and will continue to listen regularly.

KFVD

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Folder 18

March 12, 1938: From Mr. & Mrs. R.O. Pruett; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “I have just heard your program on the air 1:15 P:M and I think you two are sure swell in fact I have got you two ever since you was on the air for the victry clotheing co [sic]….”

Re. three-page handwritten letter from a fan who recently received a songbook along with some cartoons, but wishes they had an actual photograph of Woody and Lefty Lou. The author has been listening to the duo since their time on XELO and requests to hear “Jealous Lovers” and “Reno Blues.” The author originally came from Alabama and has yet to find anyone as talented in California or Alabama.

KFVD

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Folder 19

June 04, 1938: From Laura E. Marable; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “I’m listening to your program today you asked us to write you some thing that had happened to us or a joke…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter about an encounter with Sioux Indians in 1879. The author recalls being scared of the Sioux while at school and briefly mentions the tribe setting fire to some nearby lumber and their teaching warning that they could “smell the Indians a coming.” The author hopes the story is worthy of earning a songbook.

KFVD

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Folder 20

October 27, 1937: From Mrs. R.H. Crawford; Inglewood, California. Envelope & Letter. “Dear Woody and Lefty Lou and the Boys…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter about how author can hear the friendship and sincerity in every song that is performed on the program. Author requests “The old Rugged Cross” and hopes that the group can find sponsorship for support to stay on the air.

KFVD

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Folder 21

June 15, 1938: From Mary Belle Collins; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “I just heard today that you are leaving here and I am so sorry about it I could just cry [sic]…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter from listener who found the program several months prior, originally on XELO, and was drawn to Woody and Lefty Lou’s style, harmony, and temperament. Author and husband used to live in Texas and feel a connection to Woody and Lefty Lou’s Oklahoma and Missouri backgrounds. Author ends letter by rewriting the Radio Show Theme Song into a farewell tribute piece. “A real good letter,” written on envelope.

KFVD

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Folder 22

May 6, 1938: From Anonymous; Vista, California. Envelope, Letter, & Pressed Flowers. “Best wishes to you for Mothers Day.”

Re. one-page handwritten note along with pressed flowers.

Box 10

Folder 23

February 20, 1938: From Mrs. Alvin Shusher; Ontario, California. Envelope & Letter. “You can’t imagine how happy it makes me feel to hear your voice’s sining over the air again, we missed you very much when you we’re gone [sic]…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter from listener who first discovered Woody and Lefty Lou on a radio station in San Diego, but could not find the program for some time after it switched stations. The author jokingly states that her husband thinks she is in love with them, but she says she is in love with the duo’s songs and singing. Requests to hear “I’ve Got a Home in that Rock” and suggests the duo give notice if they intend to switch stations again. “Good letter” and “happy to hear voices again” written on envelope.

KFVD

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Folder 24

June 22, 1938: From Mrs. Martha Hammer; Escondido, California. Envelope & Letter. “Dear Maxine, I started to call you Lefty Lou…”

Re. four-page handwritten letter from author who cried during Woody and Lefty Lou’s final program and is currently worried about Woody’s safety while riding freight trains. Author mentions writing to Dallas newspapers, saving letters, and ends by asking Woody’s real name. Letter addressed to Maxine Crissman.

KFVD

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Folder 25

June 17, 1938: From Helen F. Laskey; Los Angeles, California. Letter. “I am sorry we won’t be able to hear you folds sing to us..”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from fan who is sad to hear that the program is ending. The author tells a brief anecdote about having the flu in the winter and how listening to the radio brought her relief. Author also mentions how unique the show was compared to other local programs.

Box 10

Folder 26

May 06, 1938: From Mrs. D Swanson; Vista, California. Letter. “I listen to your program and like it very much…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter hoping to win a songbook by submitting a joke. Author tells joke about attending a funeral, chickens, and prairie hens.

Box 10

Folder 27

June 17, 1938: From Mrs Margarette Herrin; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “My but its been grand knowing you as a radio friend I’ve never in all these years ever heard music and singing quite as nice as yours…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter sad to hear the program is ending and hoping that it returns soon. Author mentions that they wrote in for a songbook, but never heard word back.

KFVD

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Folder 28

May 03, 1938: From Patrick Henry; Hollywood, California. Envelope & Letter. “O.K. More power to you…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter on E. Schweigler Millwork Stationary from former Henryetta, Oklahoma resident.  Author invites the duo to a picnic on May 30th and requests to hear “Oklahoma Hills.”

KFVD

Box 10

Folder 29

June: From Mrs. Martha Hummer; Escondido, California. Letter. “Surely was surprised when I heard Woody say that sat was his last time on the air now Lefty Lou are you leeving too [sic]…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter author mentions that Whitey McPherson is singing on the program at the moment and they remember him from the program on XELO. Authors suggests if Lefty Lou is taking her vacation in a car they should come stay at the author’s home for a bit.

Box 10

Folder 30

December 02, 1937: From Ada, Wanda, & Ivy; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “We listen to your program every morning and think it the best on the air [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter on winter stationary of snow covered barn with children sledding. Authors are writing to wish an early Merry Christmas and request to hear “Curly Headed Baby.”

Box 10

Folder 31

October 21, 1937: From Ruth Scharff; El Monte, California. Envelope & Letter. “Gee, you don’t know what a swell program you really put on every morning…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter author requests a picture of Woody and Lefty Lou, thanks them in advance, and requests to hear “Green Valley Waltz.”

KFAC

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Folder 32

January 13, 1938: From Janice Ivy Johnson; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “I have been listening to your “Salrocin” program & want to tell you it is really good…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from author who anxiously waits every day for the 8 and 11 o’clock programs. Author enclosed 10 cents for a sample of Salrocin and for the “Book of 26 Cow Boy Songs.” Also, requests to hear “Nobody’s Darling but Mine.”

Box 10

Folder 33

June 17, 1938: From Claude Matthews; Hemet, California. Envelope & Letter. “I am going to write you again just to let you know I think you are a Crook, a false prophet, a, a, joke and I don’t know else, all because you only sing 30 minutes when you should sing at least 2 hours by all thats holey, something [sic]…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter from a passionate fan who had written previously with an enclosed payment for a sample of Salrocin that was supposed to include a free songbook. However, the author never received the songbook and is a bit sore about the whole matter. Also, requests to hear “Rancho Grande” and “The Chinese & the Japs.”

KFVD

Box 10

Folder 34

December 03, 1937: From Iva Jean Merril; Tehachapi, California. Envelope & Letter. “Dear Friends: I say friends for I’ve really fell in love with your program…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from former Missouri resident who now resides in a small town without much to do but listen to the radio. Author recently received a songbook and is curious if Woody and Lefty Lou were married and, if so, would they be willing to send a snap shot in return. Also, requests to hear “Nobody’s Darling,” or “Cowboy’s Sweetheart.”

KFVD

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Folder 35

January 27, 1938: From Perry Jackson; San Diego, California. Envelope & Letter. “Just a few words to let you know that I have been listening in on your prog [sic]…”

Re. three-page handwritten letter from 22 year old former Arkansas resident. Author writes because he is ecstatic to hear that Woody and Lefty Lou are not married and begins describing his appearance. Asks that Lefty Lou writes back to him or at least plays “Curly Headed Baby.”

XELO

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Folder 36

May 20, 1938: From Dickie Parsons & Margaret Reed; Walnut, California. Envelope & Letter. “We thank you from the depths of our hearts for your kindness in singing for us…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from longtime fans who have written to the program previously. Author is very grateful that the duo played their requests, and also mentioned their names on the air. The author presents a list of songs that they suggest should go in the next songbook: “On the Jericho Road,” “Redwing,” “Downtown Traffic Blues,” “Jesse James,” “Oklahoma Hills,” and “Blue Eyed Baby.”

KFVD

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Folder 37

January 12, 1938: From Alta Conseling; Inglewood, California. Envelope, Letter, & Postcard. “I ran across this old postcard depicting a river you certainly must remember from your talk…”

Re. one-page handwritten addressing the exaggerated colorization of the Deep Fork River picture on the enclosed postcard. The author requests to hear an Oklahoma song such as “Oklahoma Sweetheart.” Postcard is dated 1912 and brightly colored on the front with writing and stains on the back.

KFVD

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Folder 38

June 15, 1938: From Mrs. Lila Shepard and family; Willow Brook, California. Envelope & Letter. “We sure are sorry to hear you are leaving…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter from former Clinton, Missouri residents. Author wishes the duo the best of luck on vacation and hopes they return to the air soon. Request to hear “Maple on the Hill” before the show ends.

KFVD

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Folder 39

January 10, 1938: From E.A. Bailey; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “Will you be kind enough to play & sing something you think suitable for my father & mother…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter requesting that the duo play a song of their choice for the author’s parents who will be celebrating their 52nd anniversary in the upcoming week.

KFVD

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Folder 40

May 08, 1938: From Mrs. Laurence Hagelboeck; Pasadena, California. Envelope & Letter. “I am from Missouri formerly & saw in my home town paper where Lefty Lou was from those parts…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter requesting that Woody and Lefty Lou sing a song for their mother who is visiting from Clinton, Missouri. Letter ends with “next page a joke,” however, only one page is included.

KFVD

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Folder 41

June 16, 1938: From Mrs. W.A. Taylor; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “Woody & Lefty Lou my heart ackes to think your going away [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from author who is very upset the program is going on hiatus. Author writes that the world needs silly love songs and suggests that the program will be a memory they cherish forever. Author hopes the duo never take up “jazzy” music.

KFVD

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Folder 42

June 13, 1938: From Mrs. Martha Hammer; Escondido, California. Envelope & Letter. “I was a bit surprised when you called my name sat [sic]…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter only addressed to Lefty Lou from older woman whose husband passed away the previous year and currently feels very lonely. She is very thankful that Lefty Lou recently wished her a happy birthday on the air because it made her day a little brighter.

KFVD

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Folder 43

June 16, 1938: From Mrs. Alyne Stubblefield; Hollywood, California. Envelope & Letter. “I just herd you say that you were leaving the air way [sic]…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter from author who is sad to hear Woody and Lefty Lou are leaving the air as they are the best around. Author reminisces about her husband who passed away three years prior.

KFVD

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Folder 44

June 15, 1938: From Miss Evelyn Nicholas; Santa Ana, California. Envelope & Letter. “I have listened to your programs every day and certainly love your singing and playing and am very lonesome to hear you’s are leaving and there shall never be another program like yours [sic]…”

Re. four-page handwritten letter from a divorced woman with a one-year-old daughter. Author has been feeling down and shares her struggle of raising her daughter alone. Although author began dating a man in the Navy, he has been away for seven months and she misses him dearly, and she requests to hear “Gold Coast Express,” “Sailor’s Plea,” or “Anchor’s Away.”

KFVD

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Folder 45

June 19, 1938: From Etta Snowden; Arcadia, California. Envelope & Letter. “I have intended to write you before and tell you how much I enjoyed your programs…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from author who, along with their family, listen daily and hope the show returns soon.

KFVD

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Folder 46

June 16, 1938: From Miss Gertrude Offield; Pasadena, California. Envelope & Letter. “Thought I would drop you a line to let you know I have been listening to your programs…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from author who is sorry to hear Woody and Lefty Lou are taking a summer vacation. Author admits that they, too, get anxious for a summer break, but look forward to hearing the program again in the fall.

KFVD

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Folder 47

June 15, 1938: From Mrs. N.F. Thomas; La Habra, California. Envelope & Letter. “Just a few lines to let you no how we will miss you all [sic]…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter from former Shawnee, Oklahoma resident who is saddened by the program ending. Author hopes Woody and Lefty Lou eat summer watermelons to remind them of Oklahomans living in California. Also, requests to hear “What Will You Take in Exchange for Your Soul.”

KFVD

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Folder 48

May 02, 1938: From Margaret Reed; Walnut, California. Envelope & Letter. “I have been listening to, and enjoying your fine program fer might nigh on to 3 months and I reckon as to how hits about time to inform you all that I think it is great [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from author who disagrees with others that have written to the program complaining about Woody and Lefty Lou talking too much rather than playing music. In fact, the author would like to hear Lefty Lou talk more. Author also requests to hear “Down the Jericho Road” for Dickie Persons.

KFVD

Box 10

Folder 49

April 28, 1938: From Mrs. E.D. Burnell; Los Alamitos, California. Envelope & Letter. “I’m a daily listener of your wonderful program and I sure enjoy Lefty Lou’s singing especially…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from author who submits a joke about a man with whiskers hoping to win a songbook. Joke is typed and glued to stationary.

KFVD

Box 10

Folder 50

June 16, 1938: From Donald Mac McClean; Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter. “My first letter to any radio entertainer…”

Re. one-page handwritten suggesting that the program can be enjoyed by everyone young and old. Author is saddened that the show is ending but wishes Woody and Lefty Lou all the success in the world.

KFVD

Box 10

Folder 51

February 24, 1938: From Johnnie; El Monte, California. Envelope & Letter. “Are you on the air sat? [sic]…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter from 12 year-old author who has had 21 operations. Author used to live in Kansas City on a farm but has had to move around because of their sickness. Request to hear “Way Down in Missouri” and “Home on the Range.”

KFVD

Box 10

Folder 52

January 03, 1938: From Mrs. Sally Hobbs; Huntington Beach, California. Envelope & Letter. “I heard you say over today’s program that you were going to talk about landlords…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from author who was evicted from her home after having her third child. The author’s husband is away in China and she is currently forced to live in an empty storefront that has been “fixed-up” and relabeled a “de-luxe apartment.”

KFVD

Box 10

Folder 53

January 20, 1938: From Estelle Mornington; Long Beach, California. Envelope & Letter. “How in the world are you this pritty morning [sic]…”

Re. five-page handwritten letter from former Texas and Oklahoma resident. Author writes about the passing of their mother and father and how important religion is for one’s life. Also, requests to hear “Lonesome Valley.”

KFVD

Box 10

Folder 54

June 16, 1938: From Mrs. Ada Butts; La Mesa, California. Envelope & Letter. “So sorry to hear you are going to be off the radio…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter wishing Woody and Lefty Lou health, happiness, and prosperity. Author writes that the duo have sung their songs into the listeners’ hearts. Letter ends hopeful that the duo return to KFVD or another station soon.

KFVD

Box 10

Folder 55

April 26, 1938: From Mary Strunk; Costa Mesa, California. Envelope & Letter. “I have listened to your program for ages and have enjoyed it very much…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from a school teacher whose students have affectionately nicknamed “Lefty Lou” because of their left-handedness. Author writes: “Now here is my entry for a song book. I sure wish I could get one of your song books,” however, the page is ripped off following this line.

KFVD

Box 10

Folder 56

December 16, 1937: From J.H. Tippett; Lanett, Alabama. Envelope & Letter. “I listen to your program and think it is mighty good I hope I am far enough off to get a book if I do please announce this Dec. 22.”

KFVD

Box 10

Folder 57

December 16, 1937: From Jos L. Smith; Fairehouse, Pennsylvania. Envelope & Letter. “Program coming in fine same as our local stations…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from author who enjoys old time music very much. Author requests to hear “Red Wing and the Wearing of the Greece.”

KFVD

Box 10

Folder 58

December 02, 1937: From Miss Mary Lee Miller; Winchester, Virginia. Envelope & Letter. “I enjoy your program so much. Please sing for me “Just a Cabin in the Hills.”

KFVD “Sent painting 12-8-37” written on envelope.

 

Box 10

Folder 59

October 05, 1937: From Miss Elvie Iulva; Haina, Hawaii. Envelope & Letter. “I’ve been listening to wonderful and enjoyable program for about two weeks now, and would like to tell you that it’s sound so swell out here in gold old Hawaii [sic]…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter with enclosed 3 cent stamp for a copy of the lyrics to “Rancho Grande” and “The Chinese and the Japs.” Author also requests to hear the songs played over the air during their 10 o’clock broadcast.

KFBD

Box 10

Folder 60

November 25, 1937: From Roy Davis & Mathis Peters; Honolulu, Hawaii. Envelope & Letter. “We are two pals in the army, and we listen to your program most every night, and we like it very much…”

Re. one-page handwritten letter from two Navy-men stationed in Hawaii. The authors write about a picture the duo frequently talk about on the program and wonder if it would be possible for them to receive a copy. Also, request to hear “Maple on the Hill.”

KFVD

Box 10

Folder 61

November 10, 1937: From Laurence Do Rego; Wailuku, Maui T.H. Envelope & Letter. “I am a regular listener to your programs of old timeDixie Hilbilly Cowboy Cowboy songs and I love them very much [sic]…”

Re. one-page typed letter with enclosed stamp for a copy of free Cowboy Songbook. Author also requests the words to “Wreck of the Old 97” and requests to hear it played over the air during the 11 o’clock program.

KFBD

Box 10

Folder 62

October 27, 1937: From Alice Martins; Hilo, Hawaii. Envelope & Letter. “Please dedicate this son, ‘Hand Me Down My Walking Cane,’ for my dear brother Jol Martins, Gen Francisco, to Mrs Farias Ernist Farias [sic]…”

KFFDD

Bix 10

Folder 63

November 25, 1937: From Mrs. Lily Nustrom; Mission City, British Columbia. Envelope & Letter. “I have been a listener to your programs for qeute some time [sic]…”

Re. two-page handwritten letter from Canadian woman who lives outside of town and finds the radio comforting. Although she has brothers living in the U.S., the author has never visited the country but would like to do so eventually. She requests to hear “Put My Little Shoes Away” for her brothers.

 

Box 08

Folder 01

March 12, 1938: From Mr. & Mrs. McAlister; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: color image of three children playing instruments with “Receurdos” below. Back: Request to hear “When the Snowflakes Fall Again” or “The Chinese and the Japs.”

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 02

February 01, 1938: From The San Jacinto Horse Camp; San Jacinto, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: color image of Massacre Canyon Falls. Back: Request to hear “Lil Chin Bob.”

XELO

Box 08

Folder 03

February 17, 1938: From  C.E. Blairdell; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: color image of The Carillon in Richmond, Virginia. Back: Message from fan who hopes to only be in California for the winter. Author is originally from the South and appreciates the authentic sounding program.

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 04

September 18, 1937: From Nellie Martinez; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: color image of Los Angles City Hall. Back: Message from fan visiting California who appreciates hillbilly music and the fact that Woody and Lefty Lou don’t do too much talking. Requests to hear “Rattlesnake Daddy” and “Just One Year.”

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 05

March 08, 1938: From Jon Ducess; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: color image of roses with 1 Peter. 5:7 verse written below along with poem by P. Brooks. Back: Message from fan praising program and hoping that it will stay on the air for years to come.

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 06

No Date: From Mrs. J.L.; Santa Paula, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: 14 boxed images of oil drills with “Down in Oklahoma” poem. Back: Blank.

Box 08

Folder 07

January 27, 1938: From Pete, Olgo, Toots, & Ewald; Clovis, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Sketch of a cardinal in ink. Back: message from fans requesting to hear “No Disappointment in Heaven” with dedication on the air.

XELO

Box 08

Folder 08

September 15, 1937: From Mrs. WH Garmon; Altus, Oklahoma. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image, Oklahoma & his Pal Wood. Back: Message from fan in poor health who wishes to dedicate “I Dream I Search Heaven for You” to their daughter.

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 09

June 27, 1938: From Roy E Holt; Pampa, Texas. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image, Mr. Woodie Guthrie & Gang [sic]. Back: Message from fan just writing to say that the program comes in clear all the way in Texas and that Jeff’s violin sounds good.

XELO

Box 08

Folder 10

January 31, 1938: From Mrs. Lebow; Yamsay, Oregon. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image, Woodie, Lefty Lou, and Whitie [sic]. Back: Message from fan who thinks that the program is the best they’ve ever heard. Requests to hear “East Virginia Blues” no. I and II.

XELO

Box 08

Folder 11

December 04, 1937: From WH Lewis; LeRoy, Kansas. Postcard.

Re. Front: Railway Express Agency message scribbled out. Back: Delivery Instructions scribbled out with pen. Message from recent listener who is interested in a songbook, but is too poor to afford it.

KFBD

Box 08

Folder 12

December 10, 1937: From J. Koething; Saint Louis, Missouri. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan entering distance contest for free songbook.

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 13

December 08, 1937: From Mr. & Mrs. H.K. Bailiff; Sagerton, Texas. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan requesting to hear “The Maple on the Hill” and would very much like “to get the oil painting.”

KFBD

Box 08

Folder 14

June 20, 1938: From H.T. McNamee; San Pedro, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from Navy crew member who “will be a long way away when” postcard is received. Requests to hear “Old Pal I Miss You Tonight.”

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 15

December 02, 1937: From Leonard A. Martin; Basin, Wyoming. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan 1,000 miles away. Author is surprised by how well the program comes in on their 7 year-old radio. Would like to qualify for the oil painting they recently heard about on the program.

Box 08

Folder 16

November 25, 1937: From Ralph H. Flabem; Greenville, Ohio. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image: Back: Message from fan writing to enter contest for being farthest distance listener. “1st picture winner” written and underlined on back.

KFBD

Box 08

Folder 17

November 27, 1937: From R.M. Walker; Ft. Worth, Texas. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan who recently heard about the contest for the fan listening from the farthest distance. Sent in postcard to win oil painting.

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 18

December 01, 1937: From Mrs Otis Coday; Mansfield, Missouri. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: “Your program cam in very plain at 145 a.m. Our town is 49 miles east of Springfield we have Silverstone radio. 7 tubes [sic].”

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 18

December 01, 1937: From Mr. & Mrs. E.E. Hasben; Lexington, Kentucky. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fans who recently discovered the program which played at 1:30 A.M. local time. Author states that they will continue listening to the program whenever they are up late enough to hear it.

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 19

January 24, 1938: From The Carter Family; Fresno, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: “If you were raised in Oklahoma you sure can play and sing you got music dedicate it to to the Carter family!”

[A musical group that Woody Guthrie cited as one of his primary inspirations.]

XELO

Box 08

Folder 20

December 09, 1937: From Jennings Family; Pampa, Texas. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Request to hear “The Dustbowl Blues” and author hopes that the Woody and Lefty Lou stay on the air for a long time.

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 21

December 22, 1937: From Anonymous; Hanford, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Sketch of a bull that is composed of block letters drawn in ink that spells Merry Christmas. “SAME OLD BULL” is written below.

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 22

March 01, 1938: From Max & Beverly; La Verne, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image, “Max Schurr” underlined. Back: Message from friends updating Maxine Beverly’s health following an operation. The author is currently living with friends outside of Covina, California and invites Maxine “Lefty Lou” Crissman to come visit if possible.

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 23

January 22, 1938: From Jamie Gresham; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image, “Sing ‘Let Me Call You Sweetheart'” written in upper left corner. Back: “Hollywood on the Air” headline for NBC. Message inviting Woody over for cornbread. Author previously lived in Oklahoma and Texas and feels like the two are already friends.

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 24

June 16, 1938: From The Deyager Family; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message sad to hear that the program is ending. Author only listens to the Woody and Lefty Lou program and the First Fundamental Church on the radio. Author wishes the duo the best of luck in the future.

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 25

May 09, 1938: From Mrs. Martha Hammer; Escondido, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan who is about to celebrate their 62nd birthday and 44th wedding anniversary. Author has been distracted recently and missed several shows, but will do their best to not miss anymore and would like for Woody and Lefty Lou to wish them a happy birthday on the air.

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 26

March 02, 1938: From Mrs. Minnie Robinson; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image, “Send Book” written and underlined. Back: Message from listener who has sent for two songbooks in the past, but never received anything in return. Also, author mentions that they have never seen a hoopsnake, but have encountered joint snakes.

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 27

May 04, 1938: From Lorene Tisdale; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from girl who previously yodeled on their program. Also, requests to hear “Maple on the Hill” and “Picture from Life’s Other Side.”

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 28

April 14, 1938: From Mrs. Martha Hammer; Escondido, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image, “Spee.” Back: Request to hear “What Would You Take in Exchange for Your Soul?”

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 29

April 07, 1938: From T.A. Jackson; Sunland, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: “Personal Appearance.” Back: Message asking how much it would cost for Woody and Lefty Lou to make a personal appearance at a camp from 8-10 PM on April 15. The request is from a group of former Oklahoma residents who would like to hear some familiar music while enjoying a campfire.

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 30

January 22, 1938: From the Okla! Squaw; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fellow former Oklahoma residents hoping that Woody and Lefty Lou continue to stay on the air for years to come and become the biggest hillbilly show around.

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 31

June 17, 1938: From C.M. Holliday; Long Beach, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: “If you want to sell your soaps then keep Woody & Lefty Lue on the air. We have ten in the family to keep clean we never miss a program.”

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 32

June 17, 1938: From Mrs. Pearl Pervey; Altadena, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan who has listened for several months, but can no longer find the program on KFVD. Author asks if Woody and Lefty Lou will send a response about where they can listen to the program in the future.

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 33

June 17, 1938: From Mrs. Ida Hayes; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from author who is sad to hear the program is ending. Requests to hear “What Would You Give in Exchange for Your Soul” if possible.

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 34

June 16, 1938: From Mrs. B.F. Sinch; Norco, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from author who is saddened to hear the program is ending but understands because every entertainer eventually needs a vacation.

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 35

June 18, 1938: From Mr & Mrs. G.L. Blackborn; Pasadena, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from former Oklahoma resident who went to an Indian school in Pawhuska. Author wishes Woody and Lefty Lou the best of luck moving forward and hopes to hear the program on the radio again soon.

KFVD

Box 08

Folder 36

June 17, 1938: From Marta Iwan; Pasadena, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from former Houston, Texas resident who is very saddened to hear that the program is ending. Author writes that they now no longer have any worthwhile programs to listen to on the radio.

Box 08

Folder 37

May 02, 1938: From W.G. Dodge; San Diego, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan saying that their only complaint about the program is that it is too short. Author also imagines that Lefty Lou laughs the same way people laugh in heaven. Requests to hear “Lonesome Valley” and “Maple on the Hill.”

Box 08

Folder 38

March 03, 1939: From Mrs. E.P. Powell; Pomona, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan who misses the show on KFVD but is proud to hear about how Woody is doing.

Box 08

Folder 39

June 17, 1938: From Lu Garrett; Pasadena, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: “I shall miss you both badly. I like your hill billy songs.”

Box 08

Folder 40

June 17, 1938: From Lucille Swank; Ontario, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan who is sorry to hear that the program is ending. Author hopes that Woody and Lefty Lou will return to the radio soon and if the postcard is received before the final show they would like a song to be played for them.

Box 08

Folder 41

June 16, 1938: From Mrs. Ben Schmidt; Alhambra, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan who will miss the program and hopes that it will return before too long. Author mentions that they used to live on a 300 acre farm in Illinois before moving to California the previous year.

Box 08

Folder 42

June 15, 1938: From Mrs. A.J. Morris; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan who is saddened the program is ending. Author and husband previously lived in Missouri and suggest that either Woody or Lefty Lou stop by their uncle’s farm whenever they’re in the area.

Box 08

Folder 43

June 15, 1938: From Mrs. Nolan Byrd; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan saddened the show is ending but hopes it returns soon. Requests to hear “You’ll Never Miss Your Mother Until She is Gone.”

Box 08

Folder 44

June 15, 1938: From Mrs. A.M. Thompson; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan saying “I hope the description I sent of you didn’t scare you away.” Author writes that they thoroughly enjoyed the program and hopes it returns some day.

Box 08

Folder 45

June 17, 1938: From E.G. Steele; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan who liked the program more than anything else found on local radio. Author wishes Woody and Lefty Lou the best of luck in the future.

Box 08

Folder 46

April 08, 1938: From Mrs. Dane Beard; Santa Paula, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan who is currently sitting next to the radio listening to Lefty Lou’s pretty voice. Requests to hear “Over the Waves” specifically on the harp.

Box 08

Folder 47

June 16, 1938: From Sadie Gump; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan who says that losing the program is like losing a best friend. Author is thankful they previously purchased a songbook so they have something to remember Woody and Lefty Lou by.

Box 08

Folder 48

June 15, 1938: From Mrs. W.L Cozby; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan who will miss program and wishes they had been able to purchase a songbook. Author has written three times previously but does not think their letters were received because their requests were never played on air.

Box 08

Folder 49

June 16, 1938: From Mrs. A.J. Honch; Bell, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan who has listened to the program for 5 months and is sorry to hear it is ending. Author had wanted to write before, but never got around to it and wishes Woody and Lefty Lou luck in the future.

Box 08

Folder 50

June 16, 1938: From Mr. & Mrs. Gordon Warham; Torrance, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan who will miss the program that always seemed to brighten their day. Author has enjoyed the program more than any other on the air and hopes that it one day returns.

Box 08

Folder 51

June 16, 1938: From Mrs. Ada Pope; Carlsbad, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fans who previously lived in Oklahoma and recently relocated to California. Author writes that they would like to meet the Woody and Lefty Lou in person sometime and requests to hear “California Joe” if possible before the program ends.

Box 08

Folder 52

June 17, 1938: From Ray Manos; Huntington, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan who has listened to the program every day since it’s been on KFVD. Author is thankful they purchased a songbook and states: “you won’t have any trouble getting back if the people like you half as much as I do.”

Box 08

Folder 53

June 17, 1938: From S. Edwards; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan saddened that the program is ending. Author writes that Woody’s persona is difficult to figure out over the air, but they feel as though he is spiritually blessed.

Box 08

Folder 54

June 16, 1938: From Mr. & Mrs. Beard; Santa Ana, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message “We always listen to your programs and am sorry to hear that you are going to leave. Hope you will soon be on the air again.”

Box 08

Folder 55

June 24, 1938: From The Kittle Family; Verdugo, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from a family that misses the program every evening. Author mentions that the Theme Song still plays in their head from time to time.

Box 08

Folder 56

June 18, 1938: From Mr. & Mrs. Pearl Arthur; Downey, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan that just discovered the program is ending and is saddened by the news. Author hopes that people writing to Woody and Lefty Lou will help them get back on the air.

Box 08

Folder 57

June 18, 1938: From Mrs. A.L. Piper; Huntington Park, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan who previously won a songbook contest for a joke. Author is saddened that the program is ending and says that when it was on it was the brightest part of their day.

Box 08

Folder 58

June 19, 1938: From Mrs. Paul Blaney; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan who is writing after hearing the program’s final broadcast. Author hopes that Woody and Lefty Lou can find a sponsor for the program so that it will return.

Box 08

Folder 59

June 17, 1938: From W.T. Clardy; Glendale, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan who has regularly listened to the program since they discovered it. Requests to hear “Under the Maple Tree” if possible before program ends.

Box 08

Folder 60

June 18, 1938: From Mrs. Abbott; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan saddened that the program is ending. Author writes that they will be looking for Woody and Lefty Lou across the radio until they find them again.

Box 08

Folder 61

June 19, 1938: From Mrs. E.T. Andrews; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan who thinks that anytime they find a good program it goes away. Author wishes Woody and Lefty Lou the best of luck in the future and hope that they will return to radio soon.

Box 08

Folder 62

June 16, 1938: From Mrs. Dorothy Weems; Chatsworth, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from former Commerce, Oklahoma residents who moved to California two years prior. Author writes that most of their family is still in Oklahoma and if Woody or Lefty Lou are ever in the area to go and knock on their door. Also, request to hear “Brown Eyes” if possible.

Box 08

Folder 63

June 18, 1938: From Mrs. C.R. Machly; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message that reads “For goodness sake, K.F.V.D. Keep Woody and Lefty Lou on the air, there is no one just like them and we need them.”

Box 08

Folder 64

November 15, 1937: From A.C. Simpson; Torrance, Mississippi. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message that reads “Your Saturday night program came in good Sunday morn- Wishing you luck and success.”

Box 08

Folder 65

March 01, 1938: From Willard & Chas; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Black and white image of two men dressed in cowboy attire in front of Tiajuana bar. Back: Message from fans that listen to the program every afternoon. Authors are from the hills of Alabama and request to hear the “Cannon Ball One.” Note in upper left corner “this is our picture.”

Box 08

Folder 66

October 31, 1937: From Mr. Ray Connor; Reno, Nevada. Postcard.

Re. Front: Colored image of “Upper Hairpins and Windy Point on the Lariat Trail, Lookout Mountain, Colo.” Back: Message “Grand program you put over. Keep it up. Let’s hear Columbus Stockade [sic].”

Box 08

Folder 67

December 09, 1937: From Miss Monta Crawford; Creighton, Missouri. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image, “Sent Book” written. Back: Message addressed to Maxine from a hometown friend. Author forwards Lefty Lou some updated information so she can contact a friend from back home.

Box 08

Folder 68

June 18, 1938: From Luella Twining; Santa Monica, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Typed message “I have enjoyed your soothing and amusing broadcasts. You seem also to have some understanding of what is the matter with society.”

Box 08

Folder 69

April 05, 1938: From Sam Ruth; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message from fan who says the show would be be better if it were longer. Author just had a baby and wants Woody and Lefty Lou to name her. Also, request to hear “Curly Headed Baby.”

Box 08

Folder 70

December 12, 1937: From Enid Peelor Morris; Eugene, Oregon. Postcard.

Re. Front: No image. Back: Message wishing that the program came on earlier in the day because the author can only pick up a signal around midnight.

Box 09

Folder 01

 

December 28, 1937: From Ray Martin; Reno, Nevada. Postcard.

Re. Front: Black and white image of man standing before fence and words to “Down Where the West Begins.” Back: Message from frequent correspondent thankful for receiving a recent letter. Request to hear “Reno Blues.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 02

November 29, 1937: From Martin Fornell; Reno, Nevada. Postcard.

Re. Front: Black and white image of desert landscape with with words to “Mornin’ on the Desert.” Back: Message from frequent correspondent writing about friend’s letter appearing on recent program. Request to hear “Weeping Willow Tree.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 03

October 26, 1937: From Martin Fornell; Reno, Nevada. Postcard.

Re. Front: Black and white image of desert landscape with words to “Nevada” by Leslie Curtis. Back: Message “Missed your programs a lot. Good to hear you again last night. Please don’t do that again. I’d like at least one good program a night.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 04

August 26, 1937: From Mr. L.L. O’Hair and Family; Ontario, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of “Wild Flowers of the California Desert.” Back: Message “We tune in every morn to your program and think there is none better, please play “Leather Breaches” we are from Okla also [sic].”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 05

August 17, 1937: From Mrs. Hopper; Pasadena, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Hollywood Boulevard. Back: Message from former Oklahoma resident who enjoys the program and the “Oklahoma vocals.” Request to hear “My old Pal of Yesterday.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 06

August 16, 1937: From Mrs. L.D.M.E. Whister; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image looking north across Pershing Square, showing Los Angeles Biltmore. Back: Message “I tune in on your program every morning. I think they are swell, and hope you continue to stay on the air. From a lover of western songs…”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 07

January 03, 1938: From The CCC Boys of Big Sur; Big Sur, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of The Underground River in Endless Caverns, New Market, Virginia. Back: Message addressed to Whitey McPherson. Request to hear “The Yodeling Cowboy.”

XELO

Box 09

Folder 08

February 05, 1938: From Fry; Santa Monica, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Yacht Harbor, Santa Monica, California. Back: Message addressed to Whitey McPherson requesting to hear “Little Girl Dressed in Blue” and suggestion that an untitled song be called “Oklahoma Yodel.”

XELO

Box 09

Folder 09

January 03, 1938: From Mrs. Geo. Hill; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Warner Baxter home in Bel-Air, California. Back: Message from former Kansas City resident who relocated to California the previous year. Request to hear “Mama Blue.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 10

September 14, 1937: From Ruth Bell; Bell, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of highway in Santa Cruz Mountains. Back: Message requesting to hear “Bad Reputation” dedicated to “The Piggs of Bell Gardens” who came from Oklahoma.

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 11

August 17, 1937: From Baby Mae; Bell, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of three well dressed individuals with a busy person’s correspondence checklist card. Back: Message addressed to Oklahoma and Woody from fan who is happy Woody is back on the program with a request to hear “Trouble in Mind.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 12

August 16, 1937: From Mr. & Mrs. Grady Williams; Azusa, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Wilson & Co. internationally famous six-horse clydesdale team in Sand Diego, California. Back: Message addressed to the Oklahoma Cowboy. Author is originally from Ardmore, Oklahoma and requests to hear “Nobody’s Darling.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 13

April 04, 1938: From Mrs. Ethel Phillip; Ontario, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Black and white image of man and mule with “Life’s about Ore” caption. Back: Follow up message from fan who recently sent postage and payment for a songbook, but never received it. Requests to hear “Maple on the Hill.” “Wants Book” written in top margin.

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 14

October 07, 1937: From Geneva Whitaker; Bell, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of overhanging bridge in Santa Cruz, California. Back: Message requesting to hear “It’s a Picture from Life’s Other Side.” Author suggests if Woody and Lefty Lou do not know the song, they ask for someone to send them a copy to learn. Author believes the song has the potential to be very popular.

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 15

March 05, 1938: From Mrs. Drulicla; Pacific Beach, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Gatun Locks, Panama Canal. Back: Message from former Arkansas resident who recently discovered the program and enjoys it very much because it reminds her of home.

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 16

November 04, 1937: From Mrs. Mary Saber; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of the Los Angeles County General Hospital. Back: Message requesting to hear “Nobody’s Darling but Mine” or “Maple on the Hill.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 17

October 31, 1937: From Mrs. G.L. Mower; Compton, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Savage Rapids Dam, Rogue River from Pacific Highway in Oregon. Back: Message “Please send me your old time song book [sic].”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 18

March 10, 1938: From Mrs. Eckert; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Cliff House fire, dated September 07, 1907. Back: Message from fan who recently discovered program on KFVD and hopes that the “good old time singing will continue.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 19

March 15, 1938: From Another Oklahoma Pal; Anaheim, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Anaheim City Hall. Back: Message of support with request to hear “Jesus Hold My Hand.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 20

February 17, 1938: From Viola & Mary; Anaheim, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Hampton Park in Charleston, South Carolina. Back: Message from a pair of former Texas residents who listen daily and request to hear “Barbara Allen.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 21

October 28, 1937: From Mrs. Orman; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of The Breakers Club Main Dining Room in Santa Monica, California. Back: Short encouraging message with request to hear “Cattle Call.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 22

March 04, 1938: From Bernise Moss; Saticoy, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Mission San Juan Capistrano, California. Back: Message from former Missouri resident who has an upcoming birthday and requests to hear “Bury Me Beneath the Willow.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 23

October 30, 1937: From Miss Colleen Perkins; Puente, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Elks Club from Westlake Park, Los Angeles, California. Back: Message “I listen to your program every morning and enjoy it very much. Would like for you to put Cowboy’s Sweetheart in your album [sic].”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 24

February 26, 1938: From Anonymous; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Business Section in Kansas City, Missouri. Back: Message asking if Woody and Lefty Lou are kin.
KFVD

Box 09

Folder 25

January 10, 1938: From Anonymous; Santa Monica, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of “Surf During Storm.” Back: Message “Just a line to let let you know I sure injoy your merry songs. Please sang the night of 1/11/38 ‘My Pirtty Snow Dear [sic].'”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 26

December 29, 1937: From Anonymous; Maywood, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of West Lake Park, Los Angeles, California. Back: Message from fan who was born and raised in Oklahoma and is proud to say it. Requests to hear Lefty Lou sing “I Want to be a Cowboy’s Sweetheart.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 27

March 14, 1938: From O.N.G.; Pasadena, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Mission Valley Pergola Terrace, Mission Cliff Garden, San Diego, California. Back: Message requesting to hear “The Letter Edged in Black.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 28

January 19, 1938: From Mrs. M.A. Todd; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Hollywood with Los Angeles, California in the distance. Back: Message from daily listener who recently purchased a Songbook and enjoys it very much. Requests to hear “California! California!”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 29

October 27, 1937: From Mrs. P.J. Hammond; Spring Valley, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Desert Smoke Tree, California. Back: Message from former Missouri residents who request to hear “Maple on the Hill.”

KFBD

Box 09

Folder 30

March 02, 1938: From Mr. & Mrs. D.L. Hine; Reseda, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Black and white image of “Alta Vista.” Back: Message from former Missouri residents who request to hear “In the Baggage Coach Ahead.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 31

April 27, 1938: From W.L.A.; West Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of a giant cactus on the desert with rock formations in the background. Back: Message “I listen to your program when I can and think it is one of the best on the air. Please sing ‘Brown Eyes’ for me.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 32

May 16, 1938: From Jery Dean Southworth; West Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of courtroom with humorous dialogue caption. Back: Message requesting to hear “Maple on the Hill.” Also, author writes “my joke is on reverse side.

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 33

March 19, 1938: From Mr. & Mrs. Crabtree; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Hart Brothers $5,000,000 Hotel Rosslyn and Annex, Los Angeles, California. Back: Message from fan who hopes that the program finds a good sponsor and requests to hear “Nobody’s Darling but Mine.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 34

October 27, 1937: From Wanda; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of premiere night at Grauman’s Chinese Theatre, Hollywood, California. Back: Message from fan who has been in California for three months and listening to the program for as long. Author is originally from Oklahoma and requests to hear “Brown Eyes.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 35

March 22, 1938: From Sallie; Anaheim, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Dodd College, Shreveport, Louisiana. Back: Message from former Texas and Oklahoma residents who listen to the program every day and request to hear “Rock of Ages.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 36

November 23, 1937: From Ted O’Neal & H.H. Hall; Gardena, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of the Roosevelt Highway north of Santa Monica, California. Back: Message from former Texas and Missouri residents who currently work 12 hour night shifts in California. Request to hear Woody play “Bury Me Out on the Lone Prairie” on his harmonica.

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 37

March 28, 1938: From Mrs. Rosey; San Pedro, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of oil fields. Back: Message from woman whose husband is currently deployed in Honolulu and requests to hear “Blue Eyes.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 38

March 25, 1938: From Claud Whittle; Torrance, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Shirley Temple’s Home. Back: Message from fan who has the blues and requests that Woody and Lefty Lou send a picture and dedicate a song to them.

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 39

March 27, 1938: From Mr. & Mrs. F.S. Ward; Whittier, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of residence street in Orange County, California. Back: Message “Please sing some thing. Sat april 2nd. for some Arkansawers Best wishes to you both [sic].”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 40

October 29, 1937: From Ethel Saxton; San Diego, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of wild flowers on the desert. Back: Message from fan who listens to the program every day and enjoys the songs so much they cannot pick a single one to request.

Box 09

Folder 41

October 27, 1937: From John McDorris; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of “Greetings from Los Angeles.” Back: Message from former Oklahoma resident with a request to hear “Tulsa Waltz.”

Box 09

Folder 42

April 19, 1938: From Jeneta Woods; Ontario, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Buena Vista Avenue at foot of Mt. Rubidoux, Western entrance to Riverside, California. Back: Message from fan who is writing for the second time. Author has an upcoming birthday and would like Woody and Lefty Lou to dedicate a song of their choosing for the occasion.

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 43

October 30, 1937: From Bill Alfon; San Pedro, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Cabrillo Beach, San Pedro, California. Back: Message from fan who would like a songbook and would prefer if “Lamp Lighting Time in the Valley” was included in it.

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 44

January 04, 1938: From Mr. Everett Miller; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Sunken Gardens, museum, and exposition park in Los Angeles, California. Back: Message from fan who had previously written requesting a songbook. This postcard is just a follow up message asking about the status of that request.

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 45

December 06, 1937: From Mrs. Joan McDonald; Torrance, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Hotel Del Coronado. Back: Message from fan who had previously written requesting a songbook. Author is slightly upset about sending 10 cents and not receiving anything in return.

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 46

October 28, 1937: From Josie & Tex.; Torrance, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of flower beds and snowbanks in California. Back: Message requesting to hear “What Are You Squawking About” and inquiry about songbook.

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 47

October 28, 1937: From Mrs. J Junior; Torrance, California. Postcard.

Front: Color image of flower bordered walk in California. Back: Message “My family just love your program sence it has grown. Please play – you got to walk that lonesome valley. Please send your song book [sic].”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 48

October 28, 1937: From Henry Brown; Torrance, California. Postcard.

Front: Color image of springtime California wild flowers. Back: Message from former Oklahoma resident requesting to hear “Barbara Allen” or “Mean Mamma Blues.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 49

November 02, 1937: From Meryl Porterfield; Corvina, California. Postcard.

Front: Color image of Snake River Gorge showing high bridge and Shoshone Falls. Back: Message request to hear “Reno Blues” and inquiry about Songbook.

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 50

October 29, 1937: From Ruth; Glendale, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Sunkist oranges. Back: Message from former Dallas, Texas resident who requests to hear “Trouble in Mind.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 51

October 28, 1937: From Verta Hudspeth; Los Angles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Mission San Gabriel near Los Angeles, California. Back: Message from fan requesting to dedicate “Strawberry Roan” to their parents.

KFBD

Box 09

Folder 52

November 02, 1937: From A.J. Whittaker; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of El Rey Hotel in Los Angeles, California. Back: Message from fan who thinks that Woody and Lefty Lou are the “tops” and requests that the duo mail them a songbook.

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 53

October 30, 1937: From Nona Leqqilt; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of canoe on the lake, Echo Park, Los Angeles, California. Back: Message from fan whose favorite song is “Blue Eyes” and is just writing to say how much they enjoy the program and hopes it continues.

KFBD

Box 09

Folder 54

March 08, 1938: From E.A.W.; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of United States Mint, San Fransisco, California. Back: Message “Just a time to tell you how much I enjoy your programs – all of it but especially ‘leaving Nellie Home’ and those old fashioned sweet songs [sic].”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 55

October 31, 1937: From Miss Luta Mae; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of calves on west Texas range. Back: Message requesting to hear “Brown Eyed Texas Rose.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 56

June 15, 1938: From Miss Betty Black; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Carole Lombard’s home in Beverly Hills, California. Back: Message from fan upset to learn that the program is ending. Author writes that things won’t feel the same without being able to listen in. Also, suggests that either Woody or Lefty Lou visit North Carolina if the opportunity arises.

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 57

February 03, 1938: From R.G. Smith; San Diego, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Lake Hodges and Dam, San Diego, California. Back: Message addressed to Whitey & Lou; “We enjoy your programs a lot will you please dedicate the song ‘Old Faithful’ for our friends in Denver Colorado.”

XELO

Box 09

Folder 58

January 20, 1938: From O.H. Ervin; Madera, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Mill Pond. Back: Message request to hear “Will the Circle be Unbroken.”

XELO

Box 09

Folder 59

December 06, 1937: From Mrs. Evelyn Olds; Long Beach, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, California. Back: Message “I have not rec. my Song Book I sent for over 2 weeks ago. Please send it at once [sic].”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 60

February 26, 1938: From Anonymous; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Unknown Soldier Tomb in Arlington, Virginia. Back: Message “Just another card to fill that tow sack, course there is such things as a hoop snake. Sing on [sic].”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 61

January 19, 1938: From Carl Sturgis; Corona, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Golden Gate Bridge and Yacht Harbot, San Francisco, California. Back: Message “We have been listening to your programs for quite a while it is the best on the air. here is hoping you Don’t leave. Please sing ‘Moonlight and Stairs [sic].'”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 62

January 29, 1938: From Mr. & Mrs. Jack Powell; Yula City, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Color image of Pueblo village. Back: Message request to hear either “Long Last Gold Mind in the Sky” or “Among My Souvenirs.”

XELO

Box 09

Folder 63

No Date: From Olive & Mrs. M. Pack; No Location. Postcard.

Re. Front: Black and white image of cars on flooded street. Back: Message “This is the big flood of Dec. 11, 1937 in our little City Alturas- Calif. Thought you’d be pleased to see this.”

Box 09

Folder 64

December 03, 1937: From Martin Fornell; Reno, Nevada. Postcard.

Re. Front: Colored image of checkboxes with “Busy Person’s Correspondence Card” title.” Back: Message requesting to hear “I Know There is Somebody Waiting.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 65

May 06, 1938: From Mrs. Ovel Cox; Montebello, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Colored image of Desert Nightingale. Back: Message requesting a Songbook and a song dedication of Woody and Lefty Lou’s choosing for nearby family friends.

Box 09

Folder 66

February 21, 1938: From Anonymous; Culver City, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Colored image of Los Angles County Big Pines Recreation Camp; also stick figure drawing with question mark in pen. Back: Message requesting to hear “Louella” and author mentions that there are a lot of hoopsnakes in Arkansas.

Box 09

Folder 67

September 23, 1937: From Geneva Whitaker; Bell, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Colored image of “Giant” tree in Big Tree Grove, Santa Cruz, California. Back: Message from fan who recently received a requested cartoon in the mail and enjoys it very much. Requests to hear “Letter Edged in Black” or “Moonlight and Skies.” Author also wants clarification if Woody and Lefty Lou are married or not.

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 68

October 28, 1937: From Mrs. Chas Chisum; Santa Ana, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Black and white image of Golden Gate Bridge. Back: Message from fan who enjoys listening to the program every day and hopes that it continues for a long time. Requests to hear “Little is the Blind Child’s Prayer.”

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 69

March 05, 1938: From Clifford George; Long Beach, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Colored image of Los Angeles City Hall. Back: Message from fan who thinks all the program songs are wonderful. Indecipherable note requesting song.

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 70

May 03, 1938: From Mrs. Miller Bryce; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Colored image of The Jonathan Club in Los Angeles, California. Back: Message requesting that Woody and Lefty Lou sing songs to accompany the author while they take a brief vacation.

KFVD

Box 09

Folder 71

October 01, 1937: From Daisy Henry; Los Angeles, California. Postcard.

Re. Front: Colored image of Hotel Benson in Portland, Oregon. Back: Message from daily listener who appreciates the authentic sound of the program. Author writes “you bring back memories of home, please don’t go modern.”

KFVD

Box 06

Folder 22

August 30, 1937: From Katherine Ellis and others; West Los Angeles, California. Envelope & Letter.

Re. Three-page handwritten letter “We, the undersigned, have been listening to your programs and think you are one of the best on the air. We would also like very much for you to remain on the air:” accompanied by 53 signatures and addresses with final request to play “The Oklahoma Blues.”

KFVD

SERIES 3: MANUSCRIPTS

Box 04

Folder 01

“A Poem” by Woody Guthrie written in graphite on lined notebook paper; signed and dated October 10, 1937.
Box 04

Folder 02

Short handwritten commentary piece entitled “Gossip” by Woody Guthrie with a small graphite sketch in upper right corner. On the back a short paragraph entitled “Lefty Lou” is signed by Woody Guthrie and dated September 3, 1937. Both short writings would appear as sections in songbooks with slight revisions.
Box 04

Folder 03

“More Purty Gals” handwritten lyrics by Woody Guthrie on blank paper. The back of the paper is divided into three sections with two listing song titles and the third being a short rhyming paragraph about Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie.
Box 04

Folder 04

“California!” handwritten lyrics by Woody Guthrie on blank paper; signed and dated August 26, 1937.
Box 04

Folder 05

“California! California!” sheet music and lyrics. Handwritten notes and annotations appear in graphite and colored pencil. CA ’37-’38
Box 04

Folder 06

“California (The Land of the Sky)” sheet music and lyrics signed by Woody Guthrie; handwritten notes, lyrics, and verses. CA ’37-’38
Box 04

Folder 07

Two-page “Clippings From the Personal Diary of a Full Fledged Son of the Beach” by Woody Guthrie with several pencil sketches in the margins. CA ’37-38
Box 04

Folder 08

“Put Me in Your Pocket” handwritten lyrics on notebook paper.
Box 04

Folder 09

“Wabash Cannon Blues” handwritten lyrics on notebook paper.
Box 04

Folder 10

“San Antonio Rose” handwritten lyrics on blank paper.
Box 04

Folder 11

Paper titled “Red River Lulabye [sic] Songs” with list of songs and brief handwritten phrases on lined notebook paper.
Box 04

Folder 12

“Kiss me Good-Bye” handwritten lyrics on blank paper.
Box 04

Folder 13

“Cattle Call” and “Old Fashion Love” handwritten lyrics on lined notebook paper.
Box 04

Folder 14

Untitled lyrics and short creative writing passages handwritten on lined notebook paper.
Box 04

Folder 15

“When I was a Boy From the Mts.” (front) “Sweet of Strangers” (back) handwritten lyrics on lined notebook paper.
Box 04

Folder 16

“Blue Eyed Jane” (front) “Silver Haired Daddy” (back) handwritten lyrics on blank song book paper.
Box 04

Folder 17

“I’m Tying the Leaves so They Won’t Come Down” handwritten lyrics on small blank paper.
Box 04

Folder 18

Untitled lyrics handwritten on two pages of Breakfast Menu stationary.
Box 04

Folder 19

“Don’t Cry Over Me” handwritten lyrics addressed to Woody Guthrie from Orville Graham.
Box 04

Folder 20

“Free From the Chain Gang” handwritten lyrics on blank stationary paper.
Box 04

Folder 21

“Clover Blossoms” handwritten lyrics on two pages sent in by Claude Reeves.
Box 04

Folder 22

“Can the Circle be Unbroken” handwritten lyrics on two pages sent in by A. Matthews.
Box 04

Folder 23

“When the Roses Bloom Again” handwritten lyrics on two pages sent in by Leona Lehman.
Box 04

Folder 24

Untitled handwritten lyrics on lined notebook paper.
Box 04

Folder 25

“Two Little Girls in Blue” and “The Fatal Wedding” handwritten lyrics on three pages of lined notebook paper. Note written on back of final page from Mrs. C.G. Swartzjager.
Box 04

Folder 26

“Black Sheep” handwritten lyrics on four blank stationary pages. Short note to Woody and Lefty Lou at bottom of fourth page.
Box 04

Folder 27

“The Land of the Buffoo” lyrics handwritten on two pieces of onion skin paper.
Box 04

Folder 28

“The Orhpant Blinded” handwritten lyrics on five pieces of lined notebook paper submitted by Mrs. R.C. Smith.
Box 04

Folder 30

“My Little Girl” handwritten lyrics on lined notebook paper. Pencil sketch drawing of two stick figure characters on back of page with “Weeping Willow Tree” and “Curly Headed Baby” written alongside.


Series 4 : BUSINESS & PERSONAL CORRESPONDENCE

Box 06

Folder 01

Post Office Receipt from Library of Congress addressed to W. Guthrie and dated Sep. 18, 1937.
Box 06

Folder 02

Library of Congress Certificate of Copyright Registration addressed to Woodrow Wilson Guthrie. Title of music: “California! The Land of the Sky!” Words and music by Woody Guthrie; Arranged by Max Crissman; Copy received Sept. 18, 1937.
Box 06

Folder 03

Letter and Envelope from Library of Congress addressed to Mr. Woody W. Guthrie dated Sep 24, 1937 and 9-22-37.

Re. One-page typed letter explaining copyright procedure, fee, and registration.

Box 06

Folder 04

Letter from Library of Congress addressed to Sir and undated.

Re. One-page typed letter explaining “that a poem or a song without music is classifiable in the copyright law as a ‘book’ but you cannot copyright a book in typewritten manuscript form,” and “[i]f and when your poem or song is set to music, registration may be made as a musical composition whether the composition is published or unpublished.”

Box 06

Folder 05

Blank application for copyright for musical composition published in the U.S.
Box 06

Folder 06

One-page typed letter on songbook paper from Woody Guthrie to Librarian of Congress dated September 9, 1937.

Re. “Enclosed find one dollar ($1) fee for protection, which is wanted, as proprietor, and author, by Mr. Woody Guthrie…” for “California! The Land of the Sky!” Additional short note at bottom stating “I got this model letter from a book published in 1897.”

Box 06

Folder 07

One-page handwritten letter addressed to Woody & Lefty Lou from Frank Burke on Standard Broadcasting stationary.

Re. Short message inviting Woody and Lefty Lou to an informal, non-work related party, at Frank Burke’s home in Orange County. On the back of letter “Program January 5th 1937” headlines several song titles and a graphite sketch.

Box 06

Folder 08

Radio Station KFVD Rate Card No. 1 effective June 15, 1937.

Re. Card details Terms; Political and Other Talks; Talent; Remote Control; Agency Commission; Transcriptions; Program Requirements; Coverage; Station Time; and Various Rates.

Box 06

Folder 09

One-page typed letter addressed to Whom It May Concern from Frank Burke dated June 18, 1938.

Re. Complimentary letter from Frank Burke praising the ten months Lefty Lou had appeared on the station. Mr. Burke suggests that he would be delighted to take Lefty Lou back at any time and acknowledges that the Woody and Lefty Lou Show received the greatest mail response out of any program on the station.

Box 06

Folder 10

Undated and unstamped Standard Broadcasting Station KFVD envelope with Lefty Lou typed in center.
Box 06

Folder 11

One-page handwritten letter addressed to Whom It May Concern from Woody Guthrie dated June 15, 1938.

Re. One-page letter by Woody Guthrie praising Lefty Lou’s performance over the previous nine months while contributing to stations KFVD and XELO: “I highly recommend her as a radio personality, a talented person, and a human being.” Signed by Woody Guthrie with small sketch of “Woody-Lefty Lou Grand Seal.”

Box 06

Folder 12

Contract between Woody Guthrie, Lefty Lou and Standard Broadcast Station KFVD dated July 12, 1937.

Re. One year agreement between Standard Broadcast and Woody Guthrie and Maxine “Lefty Lou” Crissman. Contract details compensation, allotment of resources, responsibilities, and expectations for performance. Back of contract outlines KFVD program schedule.

Box 06

Folder 13

Contract between Standard Broadcasting Company, Woody Guthrie and Lefty Lou dated November 21, 1937.

Re. One-page typed contract detailing salary, schedule, housing, food, roles, duties, responsibilities, and other expectations.

Box 06

Folder 45

One-page typed letter by Woody Guthrie stating intention for publication of material related to Woody & Lefty Lou’s 1001 LAFFS, 101 HillCountry Songs. Signed and dated April 10, 1938.
Box 06

Folder 14

Notice of Desire to Hold Mining Claim for Lucky Day Mine No. 1 for claimant, Leon J. Guthrie, dated August 14, 1944.
Box 06

Folder 15

One-page typed letter addressed to Mrs. Roy Crissman from Ida E. Hogan dated January 28, 1946.

Re. Letter from Recorder of Plumas County addressing an ownership issue related to the Lucky Day Mining Claim. “According to our records Leon J. Guthrie is the sole owner…” “When Mr. Guthrie sold you this property, he no doubt sold you his right, title and interest that he held in the same…” “Your Deed from Mr. Guthrie should be sent to this office for recordation [sic].”

Box 06

Folder 16

Birthday card to Maxine “Lefty Lou” Crissman from Ruth and Leon with several color images and short handwritten messages that serve as captions.
Box 06

Folder 17

February 28, 2006: Copy of an e-mail.

Re. Brief message about Nora discovering the lyrics to “Sweet Maxene” online and forwarding the webpage to Maxine.

Box 06

Folder 18

November 17, 1937: From Leon Guthrie; Stockton, California. Postcard.

Re. Message from Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie to Woody and Lefty Lou reminding them that he’s been thinking about them. Leon mentions that Ruth listens to their program every day but he cannot because he works from 7 p.m. to 2 p.m. He suggests that they type off some song lyrics to send to him.

Box 06

Folder 19

February 06, 1948: From Ethel Guthrie; Woodland, California. Envelope & Letter.

Re. One-page handwritten letter addressed to Mary Cayer describing the final months and passing of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie. Letter addresses Guthrie’s declining health, the doctor’s treatments and diagnosis, preparation and eventual funeral services.

Box 06

Folder 20

December 01, 1947: From Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie; Livermore, California. Envelope & Letter.

Re. Six-page handwritten letter to Roy Crissman from Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie while at Veteran’s Hospital in Livermore, California. Letter addresses the issue of a property title which Guthrie had promised to sign over to the Crissman family. Guthrie assures Crissman he will follow through on his promise no matter what. Guthrie writes about his poor health state, but is optimistic he will be better within a year.

Box 06

Folder 21

April 15, 1938: From Maxine Crissman; Glendale, California. Letter.

Re. One-page typed letter from Maxine “Lefty Lou” Crissman discussing a recent car accident and dispute of payment and fault.

SERIES 5: PHOTOGRAPHS

Box 05

Folder 01

Photocopy of scrapbook: “Stunts & Frolics.” The Old Gang.
Box 05

Folder 02

Photocopy of newspaper article “Woman is Stabbed in Riot, Many Beaten.”
Box 05

Folder 03

Photocopy of photograph of Lettie Lee and inscription to Maxine.
Box 05

Folder 04

Photograph of Mary Cayer, Leon Guthrie, & Maxine Crissman at Chula Vista Auto Courts in Chula Vista, California. February 7, 1938.
Box 05

Folder 05

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie standing on a horse with a lasso. November 1938 Wilson Ranch, Chico, California. (With duplicate)
Box 05

Folder 06

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie standing in chaps along with Jimmy Bushy and Whitey McPherson (both seated) February 1938 Chula Vista Auto Court, California. (With duplicate)
Box 05

Folder 07

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie seated on horse outside Wilson Ranch in Chico, California. November 1938.
Box 05

Folder 08

Photograph of Mayer Cayer seated on horse outside Elf Rodeo April 3, 1938.
Box 05

Folder 09

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie seated on a horse wearing a cowboy hat.
Box 05

Folder 10

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie and Mary Cayer standing outside and wearing neckerchiefs.
Box 05

Folder 11

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie outside kneeling with a dog. (With duplicate)
Box 05

Folder 12

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie standing outside in military uniform; December 1944. (With duplicate)
Box 05

Folder 13

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie outside posing with guitar. (With inverse duplicate)
Box 05

Folder 14

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie outside pulling lassoed horse, Tarzan, April 7, 1937 at Griffith Park in Los Angeles, California.
Box 05

Folder 15

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie and Mary Ruth Cayer sitting on horse together outside Wilson Ranch, Chico, California in November 1938.
Box 05

Folder 16

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie and Mary Cayer hugging on dirt road.
Box 05

Folder 17

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie standing in front of Butte Pump & Motor WK’s. (With duplicate)
Box 05

Folder 18

Photograph of Maxine Crissman, Mary Ruth Cayer, and Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie seated on car hoods in Glendale, California.
Box 05

Folder 19

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie in military uniform standing outside with Mary Ruth Cayer and Little Jackie.
Box 05

Folder 20

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie outside with two horses.
Box 05

Folder 21

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie, Mary Ruth Cayer, and boy standing outside beside car. (With duplicate)
Box 05

Folder 22

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie and two other men standing outside all dressed in military uniforms.
Box 05

Folder 23

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie, Mary Ruth Cayer, Maxine Crissman, and two little girls on a horse.
Box 05

Folder 24

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Gurthrie and Mary Ruth Cayer posing with their faces in a cartoonish cardboard cut-out.
Box 05

Folder 25

Photograph of Maxine Crissman and Mary Ruth Cayer standing outside dressed in western outfits on February 7, 1938 in Chula Vista, California.
Box 05

Folder 26

Photograph of Mary Ruth Cayer, Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie, and Maxine Crissman dressed in western outfits standing outside on February 7, 1938 in Chula Vista, California.
Box 05

Folder 27

Photograph of Maxine Crissman standing with guitar and American flag.
Box 05

Folder 28

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie, Mary Ruth Cayer, and young boy standing outside beneath trees.
Box 05

Folder 29

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie dressed in military uniform standing outside with small boy.
Box 05

Folder 30

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie standing outside twirling a lasso.
Box 05

Folder 31

Photograph of Maxine Crissman standing outside in western gear on February 7, 1938 in Chula Vista, California. (With duplicate)
Box 05

Folder 32

Photograph of white house, barn, and fence with “Farm in Creighton” written on the back.
Box 05

Folder 33

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie standing outside with a twirling lasso around waist.
Box 05

Folder 34

Photograph of Crissmans and Guthries outside of Strand Theater, Long Beach, California, July ’37. Message on back: “L. to R. Maxine Crissman, Woody Guthrie, Mary Cayer (L.L. sister), Jack Guthrie.
Box 05

Folder 35

Photograph of Maxine Crissman holding banjo with man holding guitar, woman holding baby, woman holding mandolin, and man laying in grass. C.A. ’37-’38.
Box 05

Folder 36

Photograph of Mary Ruth Cayer, Maxine Crissman, and man all wearing hats and leaning against chain-link fence. C.A. ’37-’38.
Box 05

Folder 37

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke: Guthrie standing outside holding two glass bottles. C.A. late ’30s early ’40s.
Box 05

Folder 38

Photograph of campground with trees, tents, and shadows. C.A. late ’30s early ’40s.
Box 05

Folder 39

Photograph of Maxine Crissman and Mary Ruth Cayer standing outside in front of a commercial vehicle. C.A. late ’30s early ’40s.
Box 05

Folder 40

Photograph of Chief Harris, Roy Crissman, Mary Ruth Cayer, Maxine Crissman, Harlem Harris, Mont Harris, Sue Guthrie, Jeanie Guthrie, JoAnn Harris. February 20, 1938 in Hollywood, California. (With duplicate)
Box 05

Folder 41

Photograph of Maxine Crissman and Georgia Crissman standing in front of car. Writing on back: “On our way to Calif. 1932.”
Box 05

Folder 42

Photograph of Ray Martin (frequent fan correspondent) standing atop a pile of lumber. On back: “When I once was a wood chopper. Ray Martin.” C.A. ’30s.
Box 05

Folder 43

Photograph of Maxine Crissman outside on a motorcycle. April 6, 1937 in Glendale, California.
Box 05

Folder 44

Photograph of Maxine Crissman seated on the running board of Roy Crissman’s vehicle she and Woody Guthrie would eventually drive daily to KFVD. June 3, 1937 in Glendale, California.
Box 05

Folder 45

Photograph of Mary, Amalee, Georgia, Ruth, and Maxine Crissman standing outside. February 20, 1938 in Hollywood, California.
Box 05

Folder 46

Photograph of Maxine Crissman with banjo standing to Mary Ruth Cayer. C.A. ’37-’38.
Box 05

Folder 47

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie seated atop horse at the Elk Rodeo on April 3, 1938.
Box 05

Folder 48

Photograph of house. 213 W. Magnolia Glendale, California. C.A. late ’30s early ’40s.
Box 05   Folder 49 Photograph of Maxine Crissman holding “Little Jack” with Woody Guthrie standing in front of KFVD studio. C.A. ’37-’38.
Box 05

Folder 50

Photograph of Maxine Crissman dressed in black fur and hat. Message on back: “Lefty Lou dressed for a party at the Burke home. Santa Ana, Calif. (Owners of KFVD) 6 1937.” (With duplicate)
Box 05

Folder 51

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie and Woody Guthrie making funny faces while wearing swim trunks at Griffith Park in Los Angles, California in the Summer of 1937.
Box 05

Folder 52

Photograph of the Brand Boulevard with train tracks, buildings, and rolling hills in the distance. March 1935.
Box 05

Folder 53

Photograph of man and “Little Jack.” Message on back: “In camp -on the river about 5 miles west of Chico about the middle of August 1938 Jackie & Grandpa.”
Box 05

Folder 54

Photograph of Jimmy Bushy, Hazel Bushy, Maxine Crissman, Mat Jennings, Mary Guthrie, Lizzy Guthrie, Roy Crissman, Georgia Crissman, Jackie Cayer, Alline & Pattie Guthrie, Jeff Guthrie, and Sue Guthrie in Chula Vista, California February 7, 1938.
Box 05

Folder 55

Photograph of Maxine Crissman, Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie, Allene Guthrie, Roy Crissman, and Jeff Guthrie standing under Chula Vista Auto Court sign. February 1938. (With duplicate)
Box 07

Folder 01

Photograph of Maxine Crissman sitting outside with guitar in hand and a pile of fan mail covering her lap. C.A. ’37-’38
Box 07

Folder 02

Photograph of Maxine Crissman holding a baby and standing in front of a car and trailer. 1939 is written on back.
Box 07

Folder 03

Photograph of Guthries and Crissmans at Shepard Place, April 1941: “Half way between the depression & WWII Crissmans had just signed 5 year lease on this dairy ranch. L to R: Georgia Crissman, “Baby” Sue Guthrie, Jackie Cayer, Maxine Crissman, Woody Guthrie, Teeny Guthry, Mary Guthrie, Bill Guthrie (hidden) *Roy Crissman. (With duplicate)
Box 07

Folder 04

Photograph of Pat Dempsey holding “Little” Jack while standing atop the “Johnny Pap” tractor on Wilson Farm in April 1939.
Box 07

Folder 05

Photograph of a gold mine similar to the one Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie partially owned and left to the Crissman family after his death.
Box 07

Folder 06

Photograph of Sue Guthrie and puppy in stroller with Teeny Guthrie standing beside. C.A. 1938.
Box 07

Folder 07

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie dressed in military uniform standing outside with Mary Ruth Cayer. December 1944.
Box 07

Folder 08

Photograph of Maxine Crissman standing outside in western gear waving a cowboy hat. Chula Vista Auto Court, Chula Vista, California, 1938.
Box 07

Folder 09

Photograph of Woody Guthrie with pipe and Matt Jennings standing outside beside car. C.A. late ’30s – early ’40s (With duplicate)
Box 07

Folder 10

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie standing on a dirt road with a small dog. C.A. late ’30s-’40s.
Box 07

Folder 11

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie in military uniform hugging Mary Ruth Cayer in a fur coat standing outside in front of a car. 1944.
Box 07

Folder 12

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie in military uniform standing outside with two other men also dressed in military uniforms. December 1944.
Box 07

Folder 13

Photograph of a shaded campground with Woody Guthrie, “Little” Jack, and Maxine Crissman all resting. Written on the back: “First day at Chico, Calif- State Park 5 miles west of Chico on the Sacramento River. July 1938. L to R. The car W & L used to drive to KFVD, Woody, Jackie Cayer, Maxine Crissman.” (With duplicate)
Box 07

Folder 14

Maxine Crissman riding her horse, Tarzan, in Griffith Park on April 7, 1937 in Los Angeles, California.
Box 07

Folder 15

Photograph of George Guthrie and Maxine Crissman outside of 213 East Chestnut Glendale, California. April 1938.
Box 07

Folder 16

Photograph of Teeny Guthrie, Sue Guthrie & Jackie Guthrie as toddlers. Glendale, California 1938. Message on back: “Woody used the open range to paint and sort of a ‘hideout.”
Box 07

Folder 17

Photograph of Woody Guthrie playing with “Little” Jackie Cayer in Bidwell Park, Chico, California, summer 1938. (With duplicate)
Box 07

Folder 18

Photograph of car and trailer parked at Bidwell park with small campsite spread out in 1938.
Box 07

Folder 19

Photograph of Jimmy Bushy, Woody Guthrie, and Whitey McPherson sitting with guitars in Chula Vista Auto Court, Chula Vista, California. February 1938.
Box 07

Folder 20

Photograph of Woody Guthrie and Little Jackie Cayer and songbook lyrics to “How I Love Those Darling Eyes” October 17, 1937; Glendale, California.
Box 07

Folder 21

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie sitting on porch holding guitar. C.A. late ’30s-early ’40s.
Box 07

Folder 22

Photograph of Maxine Crissman in white pant suit and hat. “1935” written on back.
Box 07

Folder 23

Photograph of Maxine Crissman, Georgia Crissman, Mary Jennings, and unidentified man all standing outside holding stringed instruments. 1938.
Box 07

Folder 24

Photograph of the Three Star Trio with guitars: Adam, Potlicker, & Pat.
Box 07

Folder 25

Photograph of the Dusty Cowboy.
Box 07

Folder 26

Photograph of “Blue” The Driftin Yodeler standing outside in western attire holding guitar. “Radio Station X.E.M.O” written as header.

On back: “To Maxine Crissman From “Blue” The Driftin Yodeler Radio Station X.E.M.O.”

Box 07

Folder 27

Photograph of the Beverly Hill Billies: Lem, Hank, Baron Vonegidy, Jad, Manning, Nick, and Chuck.

Compliments of King Outfitting Co.

Box 07

Folder 28

Photograph of Jimmie & His Saddle Pals posing with instruments:  Chuck, Pal, Doug, Jimmie, Wallie, Gladys, Dick, Vince, and Carl.

Compliments of King Outfitting Co.

Box 07

Folder 29

Photograph of the Montana Cowgirls wearing hats: Ruth, Peggy, and Loraine.
Box 07

Folder 30

Photograph of “Texas Ramblers” standing outside with instruments; Courtesy of K.G.E.R. Long Beach, California: Chuck, Cactus, Hal, Little-Bit, Shorty, Elmer, and Stepladder.
Box 07

Folder 31

Photograph of The “Beverly Hill Billies”: Charlie, Clint, Jad, Mirandy, Lem, Ezra, and Gus.
Box 07

Folder 32

Photograph of two men on horse and several standing near a fence on ranch land.

On Back: Stamp from Venus Health Corporation: Doc and Dave (Back row), Stewart Hamblin, Norman, Frank, Vince, Nicola, Bob, (mounted) Herman the Hermit.

Box 07

Folder 33

Photograph of the Beverly Hill Billies: Hank, Mirandy, Ezra, Gus, Zeke, Lem, and Jad.
Box 07

Folder 34

Photograph of Farley’s Gold Star Rangers holding instruments and wearing western outfits.

Courtesy of K.F.W.B.

Box 07

Folder 35

Photograph of Farley’s Gold Star Rangers sitting with instruments.
Box 07

Folder 36

Photograph of Stewart Hamblen and His Gang: Vince, Norman, Joe, Dave, Stewart, Herman, Frank, Sug, and Bob.

Compliments of The Star Outfitting Co.

Box 07

Folder 37

Photograph of Stewart Hamblen with his favorite bronco and pet calf.

On back: “Excess fat is dangerous” Advertisement for Venus Reducing Tablets; courtesy of the Venus Health Corporation.

Box 07

Folder 38

Photograph of The Coveraged Wagon Jubilee: Archie, Len, Jerry, Vince, Potlicker, George Carefoot, Ossie, Stuart Hamblin [sic], Herman, Skeeter, Sonny, Dave, Cliff.

On back: “Excess fat is dangerous” Advertisement for Venus Reducing Tablets; courtesy of the Venus Health Corporation.

Box 07

Folder 39

Photograph of The Riders of the Purple Sage with envelope addressed to Maxine Crissman. January 25, 1935. Jack Dalton, Irma Dalton, Bugs, Calico, Half Pint, and Lucky.
Box 07

Folder 40

Photograph of Woody Guthrie, Maxine “Lefty Lou” Crissman, and Whitey McPherson posing outside of studio XELO Tijuana, Mexico in February 1938.
Box 07

Folder 41

Photograph of Shorty, Buck Evans, Maxine “Lefty Lou” Crissman, Allene Guthrie, Whitey McPherson, Woody Guthrie, Smoky, Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie, Rusty, Jeff Guthrie, “Possum Trot” Bruce, Slim, and Jimmy Bushy posing outside of XELO studios in Tijuana, Mexico in February 1938.
Box 07

Folder 42

Three negative photographs with envelope. Negatives correspond to Box 7 folder 39 and 40.
Box 07

Folder 43

Photograph of “Possum Trot” Bruce, Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie, Jeff Guthrie, Jimmy Bushby, and Allene Guthrie posing in front of Studio XELO in Tijuana, Mexico. February 1938.
Box 07

Folder 44

Photograph and Clipping of the Beverly Hill Billies singer, Mirandy. February 9, 1937.
Box 07

Folder 45

Photograph of Maxine “Lefty Lou” Crissman covered in fan mail holding guitar CA ’37-’38.
Box 07

Folder 46

Photograph of Maxine “Lefty Lou” Crissman on horse with cowboy hat November 27, 1937.
Box 07

Folder 47

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie and Woody Guthrie on car with sign that reads: “Strand Beverly Hillbillies On Stage! In Person!” CA: Summer 1937
Box 07

Folder 48

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie and Mary Ruth Cayer in western attire with guitar.
Box 07

Folder 49

Photograph of Mary Ruth Cayer in western shirt and cowboy hat.
Box 07

Folder 50

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie in Western shirt and cowboy hat with guitar and KOH microphone.
Box 07

Folder 51

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie and Mary Ruth Cayer with several others posing around a KSAN microphone.

Note at bottom: “To sister, From your sister and brother, Mary and Jack.”

Box 07

Folder 52

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie holding a guitar. Dated January 4, 1944.
Box 07

Folder 53

Photograph and Postcard. July 26, 1938. From Woody Guthrie to Crissman Family. Photograph of Maxine “Lefty Lou” Crissman standing in front of car and trailer holding a baby. Drawing of car and trailer on back of postcard with caption: “Did you get away?”
Box 07

Folder 54

2 photographs: One of of older Maxine Crissman with banjo. Second photo is banjo resting on chair with broken banjo head.
Box 07

Folder 55

Photograph of Mary Ruth Cayer and Maxine “Lefty Lou” Crissman standing outside in jeans and t-shirts on July 10, 1937.
Box 07

Folder 56

Photograph of Maxine “Lefty Lou” Crissman with man and child.
Box 07

Folder 57

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie dressed in military attire standing outside of house with family members CA 1944.
Box 07

Folder 58

Photograph of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie dressed in military attire standing outside of house with family members. CA 1944.
Box 05

Folder 56

Photograph of Woody Guthrie and Maxine “Lefty Lou” Crissman kneeling outside with instruments and advertisement for KFVD radio program dated September 1937.

Clipping of advertisement for KFVD daily programs dated April 8, 1938.

Box 11

Folder 01

Photograph of Woody Guthrie standing outside and holding baby Jackie Cayer (1 month old) in Glendale, California on October 17, 1937.

Song Book Lyrics “How I Love Those Darling Eyes” with handwritten annotation “Written for Baby Cayer).

Box 11

Folder 02

December 25, 1937. From Martin Fornell. Reno, Nevada. One-page typed letter, envelope, and two photographs.

Re. Photograph of man standing outside (“your ardent addmirer [sic]” written on back) and photograph of man seated on a horse (“Mary Pond, Harry” written on back).

One-page typed letter from frequent correspondent writing after listening to the Christmas Eve broadcast. Author mentions a friend, a former Madison Square Garden Rodeo contestant, who currently works on a ranch in Reno and has recently fallen ill. Author includes 25 cents for a songbook to be shared with fellow ranch companions. Author also mentions that Woody and Lefty Lou’s songs give off an inspirational feeling, however, they suspect that there are religious undertones as well.

Box 11

Folder 03

February 23, 1938. From The Gang. Los Angeles, California. One-page typed letter, envelope, and photograph.

Re. Photograph of five individuals in Fredrick, Oklahoma in 1921. Short passage is written on the back in graphite.

One-page letter is written with the consent of 21 individuals from Oklahoma and Texas who refer to themselves as “The Gang.” Author mentions the disappearance of Mary Morgan and suggest Woody and Lefty Lou address the issue on their show. The Gang also requests to hear “Maple on the Hill.”

Box 11

Folder 04

June 16, 1938. Escondido, California. Envelope & two photographs.

Photograph of woman and young girl standing outside standing outside wearing white dresses (“This is me and my granddaughter. That’s here in Escondido” written on back).

Photograph of several people sitting and posing on a car (“And the Rest are part of my family sure a bunch here one boy still single. the one with the x he is num 22 [sic].”

Box 11

Folder 05

Photograph postcard of Adam Windbush, “XEMO Radio Star, Highest Yodeler in the World,” kneeling with revolver beside horse and guitar.

Addressed to Maxine Crissman 213 W. Magnolia Glendale, California. Signed, “Best wishes, Adam.”

Box 11

Folder 06

Photograph of Riders of The Rio Grande: Tex, Pan, Mac, Clarence, Ray, and Bob. All posing outside with hats, hanker-chiefs, and instruments.
Box 11

Folder 07

Photograph postcard of Buck Evans & His Montana Buckaroos: Shorty, Slim, Buck, Rusty, and Smoky. “XELO: 1937-38.”

(Two duplicates, one has names handwritten on back.)

Box 11

Folder 08

Large photograph of KTM Ranch Boys sitting outside in costumes and instruments: Bottles, Jack Ross, Col. Bainbridge, Pokey, Jimmy Adams, and Danny (With two duplicates of postcard photographs courtesy of Crazy Water Crystals).
Box 11

Folder 09

Photograph postcard of three unidentified men and Elton Britt with instruments.

C.A. late 1930s early 1940s.

Box 11

Folder 10

Photograph of The Texas Drifter with guitar.
Box 11

Folder 11

Photograph of Bruce & His Texas Cowtown Boys: Bruce, Smokey, Pierce, Jerry, Lightning, and Major; Station KIEV.
Box 11

Folder 12

Photograph postcard of the Texas Longhorns: Slim, Rodger, Tommy, Baby Face, and Speck; standing outside posing with instruments and KMPC microphone.
Box 11

Folder 13

Double sided photograph split into four panels with captions: The Carter Family; Cowboy Slim Rinehart; The Suppertime Frolics Folks; and Mainter’s Mountaineers.
Box 11

Folder 14

Photograph postcard of Buck Evans the “Singing Cowboy from Powder River Montana” with guitar.

XELO 1937-38 (with duplicate)


SERIES 6: EPHEMERA

Box 13

Folder 01

Four pages of jokes typed on yellowed paper with “Contributed by Opal Brooks Santa Monica, Calif.” handwritten on bottom. (These were most likely fan submissions made to the radio program’s “Best Joke” contests.)
Box 13

Folder 02

List of song titles handwritten in graphite on cardboard paper. “10:15 -Friday- KFSL” written on back at the bottom.
Box 13

Folder 03

One-page typed letter that details the funny story of a newly married couple’s recent misunderstanding.
Box 13

Folder 04

Five-pages of yellow notebook paper with notes and corresponding page numbers that relate to the 2004 biography, “Ramblin’ Man: The Life and Times of Woody Guthrie.” First page begins with “I found those in Ed Cray’s book.”
Box 13

Folder 05

August 17, 1941. Reno, Nevada. From Max & Pat. Postcard.

Front: Image of cupid in chaps with cowboy ringing a large bell with “Just Married at Reno” caption and signed by Pat and Max Dempsey. Back: ” Addressed to Mr & Mrs R.O. Crissman: Dear Folks, We were married at 10:19 1/2 a.m. Sun. Aug 17, 1941. Love, Max & Pat.”

Box 13

Folder 06

No date. Postcard. From Cradle Roll Department. Creighton, Missouri.

Re. postcard with invitation to join a baby cradle roll and note that reads: “If you accept this invitation please return acceptance card this weekend. Want to make out my list for May.”

Box 13

Folder 07

Single-sheet of white paper with two handwritten addresses
Box 13

Folder 08

List of several addresses handwritten on back of Olympic Radiator Co. stationary.
Box 13

Folder 09

Long strip of paper with a running tally of mail received day by day from August 6 to November 30 in 1937. Tally is divided month by month and results in 2755 pieces of mail received in total.
Box 13

Folder 10

List of dates ranging from May 12 to November 12 with notes handwritten on single sheet of white paper titled “1937-” and signed at the bottom by Allene Guthrie.
Box 13

Folder 11

Handwritten list of events with short descriptions. No dates. “Had a contract & signed another contract.”
Box 13

Folder 12

Laura Moore’s address handwritten on lined notebook paper.
Box 13

Folder 13

Small sheet of paper with brief handwritten notes.
Box 13

Folder 14

Brief handwritten notes on blank envelope.
Box 13

Folder 15

Handwritten notes, addresses, song and poem titles on blank piece of paper. No dates.
Box 13

Folder 16

Yellow notebook paper with six handwritten addresses.
Box 13

Folder 17

Pamphlet from “The World Famous Ambassador Hotel” in Los Angeles. Pamphlet includes prices, upcoming events, and schedule for February 20-26 late ’30s early ’40s.
Box 13

Folder 18

Two admission party tickets for “The Museum of Memories” in Virginia City, Nevada.
Box 13

Folder 19

Jeff Guthrie business card: “For your next entertainment.” Back is printed to mimic a playing card.
Box 13

Folder 20

Ticket for Los Angeles Angles baseball game at Chavez Ravine: August 7, 1965.
Box 13

Folder 21

Johnny’s Wheel & Frame Adjustment business card.
Box 13

Folder 22

Typed note from M.M.R. about pure wood alcohol concentrate.
Box 13

Folder 23

Handwritten note: “A man from LA-Jolla wants ‘where the sweet `azealias [sic] bloom’  .90c phone call.”


SERIES 7: ARTIFACTS

Box 05  Banjo (permanent exhibit; box contains original banjo head)
Box 15 Ash tray used to stencil design for original banjo head


SERIES 8: CLIPPINGS

Box 12

Folder 01

Clipping of an image of Possum Trott Bruce and his Cow Town Boys with caption on a future performance at Brady’s Public Market; the caption also mentions that Brady and his organization won the 1933 Fiddlers Prize.

Graphite annotation dated: September 19, 1935.

Box 12

Folder 02

Clipping from Radioshow with images of Lew Sterns, Howard Gray, and Byron Dunham-the Voices of Station KFVD.

Vol. 1, no. 36: October 30, 1937.

Box 12

Folder 03

Small clipping describing Woody and Lefty Lou and their daily show that appeared on KFVD at 1:30

Pen annotation dated: May 13, 1938.

Box 12

Folder 04

Clipping from the Creighton Banner on Lefty Lou (several paragraphs taken from the “Lefty Lou” section found in “Old Time Hill Country Songs” Book).

Graphite annotation dated: Thursday, December 9, 1937.

Box 12

Folder 05

Clipping from the Creighton Banner titled “Former Creighton Girl on KFVD, Los Angeles” (two strips).

Pen annotation dated: 1937

Box 12

Folder 06

Clipping from Chico Enterprise Record titled “Ex-Chicans to Compete” with an image of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie and Ruth Cayer with a paragraph explaining a future performance at the Hollywood Bowl and their upcoming morning radio program on KPAS (Pasadena).

Tuesday Evening, October 31, 1944.

Box 12

Folder 07

Clipping of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie photographed sitting on a rocking horse while holding a guitar with caption that mentions Gene Autry, Roy Acuff, Tex Ritter, and “Kapers in Khaki.”

No Date: CA early ’40s.

Box 12

Folder 08

Two Clippings on the death of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie.

“Singer Dies” with image of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie, short caption, and handwritten annotation dated January 15, 1948.

“Entertainer Jack Guthrie, Former Chicoan, Is Dead” with several paragraphs describing his life and career with handwritten annotation “Died January 15, 1948.”

Box 12 Folder 09 Clipping “Cowboy Rides Hobby For ‘Kapers In Khaki’ Show Corrals Jack Guthrie” with with image of Leon (Jack) “Oke” Guthrie and several paragraphs describing previous and upcoming performances in San Francisco area (two pieces).
Box 12

Folder 10

Clipping from The Farm News of “Clover Blossoms” Lyrics contributed by Sara Edith Dickson.
Box 12 Folder 11 Clipping of “Mississippi Valley Blues” Lyrics.
Box 12

Folder 12

Clipping of “Cowboy’s Home, Sweet Home” Lyrics contributed by Martha Knutson.
Box 12  Folder 13 Clipping of “Maple on the Hill” Lyrics.
Box 12

Folder 14

Clipping of “Rocking Alone In an Old Rocking Chair” Lyrics.
Box 12

Folder 15

Clipping of “Death of Floyd Collins” Lyrics.
Box 12 Folder 16 Clipping of “The Letter Edged in Black” Lyrics.
Box 12 Folder 17 Clipping of “The Jealous Lover” Lyrics.
Box 12

Folder 18

Clipping of “When It’s Lamp Lighting Time in the Valley” Lyrics.
Box 12

Folder 19

Clipping of “Barbara Allen” Lyrics.
Box 12 Folder 20 Clipping of “Red Wing” Lyrics.
Box 12 Folder 21 Clipping of “Picture on the Wall” Lyrics.
Box 12 Folder 22 Clipping of “Shake Hands With Mother Again” Lyrics.
Box 12

Folder 23

Clipping of “I Dreamed I Searched Heaven for You” Lyrics.
Box 12

Folder 24

Clipping title “Old Songs and Poems” with ‘The Calf Path’, ‘Home Sweet Home’, ‘Sweet Birds’, ‘The White Pilgrim’, and ‘The House Carpenter’ Lyrics.
Box 12

Folder 25

Clipping of untitled lyrics contributed by P.D. Gog.
Box 12 Folder 26 Clipping of “My Old Dog Tray” Lyrics.

Graphite annotation: “Edna E. Wing Bell, California.”

Box 12

Folder 27

Clipping of untitled lyrics and “Lackey Bill” Lyrics (two pieces) sent in by Ray and Mary Fisher (reprinted with permission of John A. Lomax, from his book entitled “Cowboy Songs”).

SERIES 9: ARTWORK

Box 04

Folder 29

Drawing by Woody Guthrie on lined notebook paper with image of man holding two sandwiches with caption: “Them Samwiches shore wus SWELL!”
Box 04

Folder 31

Drawing by Woody Guthrie of a male figure with scruffy face and hat with caption: “Trigger Finger Baxter.”
Box 04

Folder 32

Drawing by Woody Guthrie of a male figure holding a glass with caption: “Bob.”
Box 04

Folder 33

Drawing by Woody Guthrie of two people sitting with instruments. The official Woody and Lefty Lou Seal is drawn in the bottom right corner and “Okla” is below the two main figures.
Box 04

Folder 34

Drawing by Woody Guthrie of one male figure playing the guitar and another male character playing the harmonica.
Box 04   Folder 27 Souvenir drawing of Lefty Lou and Woody singing with caption “Yores truely – Lefty Lou & Woody KFVD – 8:15 A.M. 11:00 P.M.” and “So if you like this here souvenier why tell yore friends [sic].” (Photostat and duplicate)

SERIES 10: LYRICS & SHEET MUSIC

Box 06

Folder 23

Typed sheet music & lyrics: “What the World Needs is Jesus.” From World’s Womans Christian Temperance Union dated June 02, 1937.
Box 06

Folder 24

Brochure titled “Sacred Song” as featured by Bob Pierce. Includes sheet music and lyrics for “A Little Bit More” and “Keep on Believing.” Also popular melodies “Always,” “When the Moon Comes Over the Mountain,” “After the Ball is Over,” “By-ways are Happy Ways,” and “Deeper and Farther with Jesus.”
Box 06

Folder 25

Typed lyrics to “Free at Last” with pencil annotations and handwritten message “Best wishes, Hobo Bill.”
Box 06

Folder 26

Typed sheet music & lyrics: “Where We’ll Never Grow Old” and “I Miss Dear Mother and Dad.”
Box 06

Folder 27

Typed sheet music & lyrics: “Life’s Railway to Heaven” and “Open Wide the Door” and “Christ Shall Reign.”

Handwritten margin annotation in red ink: “Sent in by: Mrs. W.O. Care- Chino.”

Box 06

Folder 28

Typed sheet music & lyrics: “Love Took it Away,” “Shake Hands with Mother Again,” and “If I could Hear My Mother Pray Again.”
Box 06

Folder 29

Typed lyrics: “Horse Sense.”
Box 06

Folder 30

Typed lyrics: “Dedicated to a Horse.”
Box 06

Folder 31

Typed lyrics: “Missouri.”
Box 06

Folder 32

Handwritten lyrics on notebook paper: “You Are My Sunshine” and “Your My Darling [sic].”
Box 06

Folder 33

Handwritten lyrics on songbook paper: “That Good Old Country Lawn Where I Was Born” & “When the Cactus is in Bloom.”
Box 06

Folder 34

Handwritten lyrics on songbook paper: “Prairie Lullaby” and “Little Sweetheart of the Mountains.”
Box 06

Folder 35

Handwritten lyrics on songbook paper: “Where the Bees Are in the Hive” & “Little Mother of the Hills.”
Box 06

Folder 36

Handwritten lyrics on songbook paper: “Ridge Running (Runnin’) Roar.”
Box 06

Folder 37

Handwritten lyrics on songbook paper: “The Vacant Cabin Door” & “The Cowboy’s Sweetheart.”
Box 06

Folder 38

Handwritten lyrics on songbook paper: “Little Joe” & “Answer to Twenty-one Years.”
Box 06

Folder 39

Handwritten lyrics on notebook paper: “Worried Money Mind.”
Box 06

Folder 40

Handwritten lyrics on songbook paper: “I’ll Be Thinking of You Little Gal” & “Old Smoky Mountain.”
Box 06

Folder 41

Brochure “I’ll Be a Friend to Jesus” from John Brown University. Lyrics and sheet music to “I’ll Be a Friend to Jesus (Our Theme Song)” with handwritten note “This is my favorite song will you and your grand singers sing it for me Monday? Think you Woody & all [sic].”
Box 04

Folder 35

Souvenir lyric page of “The Chinese & The Japs” typed and printed on blank paper with short paragraph above the lyrics. Similar to the lyric pages found in song books.
Box 06

Folder 44

Sheet music and lyrics for “In Those Oklahoma Hills Where I was Born” with handwritten annotations; signed and dated by Woody Guthrie April 15, 1938.